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I need to implement a windows-like service for Linux system. There is C++ code which do a particular job which I want to be run by schedule (every minute).

The service will be always up and running 24h/day, 7d/week and 365d/year and should be highly fault tolerant.

What is the best suitable approach to implement such service? Daemon, Linux service, cron e.t.c or some combination of them?

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closed as not constructive by shellter, Evgeny Kluev, BЈовић, WhozCraig, Graviton Dec 17 '12 at 4:19

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Cron every minute sounds silly, just implement a daemon. There is no standardized "linux service api" as there is for windows, and no obvious equivalent of svchost. –  cdleonard Nov 19 '12 at 15:06

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

You normally do that using either a cron job or a daemon, but not both.

There is C++ code which do a particular job which I want to be run by schedule (every minute).

That sounds like a candidate for a cron job. If you need to keep a lot of state in between invocations though, a daemon with a 1-minute timer in it could be a better option.

You may like to provide more details on what your application is supposed to do.

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additional info: the service should be run under root permissions, so it is highly privileged –  ohavryl Nov 19 '12 at 15:41
    
@ohavryl: that doesn't change much. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Nov 19 '12 at 16:22

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