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I need a temporary table in my programme. I have seen that this can be achieved with the "mapper" syntax in this way:

t = Table(
    't', metadata,
    Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
    # ...
    prefixes=['TEMPORARY'],
)

Seen here

But, my whole code is using the declarative base, it is what I understand, and I would like to stick to it. There is the possibility of using a hybrid approach but if possible I'd avoid it.

This is a simplified version of how my declarative class looks like:

import SQLAlchemy as alc
class Tempo(Base):
    """
    Class for temporary table used to process data coming from xlsx
    @param Base Declarative Base
    """

    # TODO: make it completely temporary

    __tablename__ = 'tempo'

    drw = alc.Column(alc.String)
    date = alc.Column(alc.Date)
    check_number = alc.Column(alc.Integer)

Thanks in advance!

EDITED WITH THE NEW PROBLEMS:

Now the class looks like this:

import SQLAlchemy as alc

class Tempo(Base):
        """
        Class for temporary table used to process data coming from xlsx
        @param Base Declarative Base
        """

        # TODO: make it completely temporary

        __tablename__ = 'tempo'
        __table_args__ = {'prefixes': ['TEMPORARY']}

        drw = alc.Column(alc.String)
        date = alc.Column(alc.Date)
        check_number = alc.Column(alc.Integer)

And when I try to insert data in this table, I get the following error message:

sqlalchemy.exc.OperationalError: (OperationalError) no such table:
tempo u'INSERT INTO tempo (...) VALUES (?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?)' (....)

It seems the table doesn't exist just by declaring it. I have seen something like create_all() that might be the solution for this (it's funny to see how new ideas come while explaining thoroughly)

Then again, thank you very much!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is it possible to use __table_args__? See http://docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/latest/orm/extensions/declarative.html#table-configuration

class Tempo(Base):
    """
    Class for temporary table used to process data coming from xlsx
    @param Base Declarative Base
    """

    # TODO: make it completely temporary

    __tablename__ = 'tempo'
    __table_args__ = {'prefixes': ['TEMPORARY']}

    drw = alc.Column(alc.String)
    date = alc.Column(alc.Date)
    check_number = alc.Column(alc.Integer)
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Just perfect, thank you very much! –  ikaros45 Nov 19 '12 at 14:50
    
Uhm, I shouldnt have gone that fast. Insertion seems to be ok, but when I try to commit, it crashes. I thought this makes sense for temporary tables, but when I try to query without commiting, it also crashes. How do I query the data inside of the tempo table? I'm not very experienced with SQLite... Thanks in advance. –  ikaros45 Nov 19 '12 at 15:03
    
That's weird! I haven't tested this myself, but I thought __table_args__ were simply passed to the table constructor. I don't know enough about SQLite to give you a definite answer. Could you update your question with the error message you get when it crashes? –  vicvicvic Nov 19 '12 at 19:58
    
Hi again, I just edited the original message with the extra explanation. Thanks again! –  ikaros45 Nov 20 '12 at 16:43
    
Simply declaring the table is not enough for any table (temporary or not). You have to call create_all to actually create the tables. See docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/rel_0_8/orm/extensions/… –  vicvicvic Nov 22 '12 at 10:42
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