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Whenever I attempt to render a textured quad, I end up with a triangular section of the texture distorted: see this image.

The texture is a PNG created in GIMP, and I've tried two seperate methods of loading the texture (both from Apple's own sample code). Each method of loading the texture produced different results (I don't know if it is different default settings, or if there is a problem with the texture), but I couldn't get either to render proper.

I've tried setting up my indices/verticles/texices in multiple different ways, from suggestions posted in Fastest way to draw quads in OpenGL ES? yet still no luck.

What could I be missing?

Code to Load Texture

- (GLuint)setupTexture:(NSString *)fileName {    
    CGImageRef spriteImage = [UIImage imageNamed:fileName].CGImage;
    if (!spriteImage) {
        NSLog(@"Failed to load image %@", fileName);
        exit(1);
    }
    size_t width = CGImageGetWidth(spriteImage);
    size_t height = CGImageGetHeight(spriteImage);
    GLubyte * spriteData = (GLubyte *) calloc(width*height*4, sizeof(GLubyte));
    CGContextRef spriteContext = CGBitmapContextCreate(spriteData, width, height, 8, width*4, 
    CGImageGetColorSpace(spriteImage), kCGImageAlphaPremultipliedLast);    
    CGContextDrawImage(spriteContext, CGRectMake(0, 0, width, height), spriteImage);
    CGContextRelease(spriteContext);
    GLuint texName;
    glGenTextures(1, &texName);
    glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, texName);
    glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_NEAREST); 
    glTexImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, GL_RGBA, width, height, 0, GL_RGBA, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, spriteData);
    free(spriteData);        
    return texName;    
}

Texture Coordinates and Verticles

const GLfloat texices[] =
    { 0,1,
      1,1,
      0,0,
      1,0 };

glActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE0);
glUniform1i(_texturedTextureUniformSlot, 0);
glVertexAttribPointer(_texturedTextureSlot, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 0, texices);

GLfloat vertices[] = {-1, -1, 0, //bottom left corner
                  -1,  1, 0, //top left corner
                   1,  1, 0, //top right corner
                   1, -1, 0}; // bottom right rocner

GLubyte indices[] = {0,1,2, // first triangle (bottom left - top left - top right)
                 0,2,3}; // second triangle (bottom left - top right - bottom right)

glVertexAttribPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, 0, vertices);
glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLES, 6, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, indices);
share|improve this question
    
Is your texture power of two? Please show more code. –  Felix K. Nov 19 '12 at 14:35
    
Yes, it is 1024x1024. I've also just now attached the setupTexture function to my post. –  Mr. Smith Nov 19 '12 at 14:46
    
Please post some of the code where texture coordinates are specified for your screen-aligned quad. –  bosmacs Nov 19 '12 at 14:46
    
Added texture coordinate code, I believe these are the coordinates that generated that screenshot. –  Mr. Smith Nov 19 '12 at 15:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks like your texture coordinates may be wrong (notice the texture appears to be wrapping around the left side).

Here is a snippet of code that I've used in the past:

const float quadPositions[] = {  1.0,  1.0, 0.0, 
                                -1.0,  1.0, 0.0, 
                                -1.0, -1.0, 0.0, 
                                -1.0, -1.0, 0.0, 
                                 1.0, -1.0, 0.0, 
                                 1.0,  1.0, 0.0 };
const float quadTexcoords[] = { 1.0, 1.0, 
                                0.0, 1.0, 
                                0.0, 0.0, 
                                0.0, 0.0, 
                                1.0, 0.0, 
                                1.0, 1.0 };

// stop using VBO
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);

// setup buffer offsets
glVertexAttribPointer(ATTRIB_VERTEX, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 3*sizeof(float), quadPositions);
glVertexAttribPointer(ATTRIB_TEXCOORD0, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 2*sizeof(float), quadTexcoords);

// ensure the proper arrays are enabled
glEnableVertexAttribArray(ATTRIB_VERTEX);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(ATTRIB_TEXCOORD0);

// draw
glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 2*3);

That should draw a two triangles at z=0. You'll want to setup your projection from -1 to 1 in width and height.

Edit:

Here's a working version of your code:

const GLfloat texices[] = { 0, 0,
                            0, 1,
                            1, 1,
                            1, 0 };


const GLfloat vertices[] = { -1, -1, 0,  // bottom left corner
                             -1,  1, 0,  // top left corner
                              1,  1, 0,  // top right corner
                              1, -1, 0}; // bottom right corner

const GLubyte indices[] = { 0, 2, 1,     // first triangle (bottom left - top left - top right)
                            0, 3, 2 };


// ensure no VBOs or IBOs are bound
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);    

glVertexAttribPointer(ATTRIB_VERTEX, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 3*sizeof(float), vertices);
glVertexAttribPointer(ATTRIB_TEXCOORD0, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 2*sizeof(float), texices);

// ensure the proper arrays are enabled
glEnableVertexAttribArray(ATTRIB_VERTEX);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(ATTRIB_TEXCOORD0);

glDisable(GL_CULL_FACE);

glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLES, 6, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, indices);
share|improve this answer
    
There is no combination of texture coordinates and texture vertices that I have found that work. You may still be right, but I'm extremely skeptical, as my code is ripped straight off tutorials on OpenGL ES 2.0. The only difference is that said tutorials weren't written for 2D rendering. Is it possible there some function I need to call to get triangles rendering on Z=0.0f to appear correctly? –  Mr. Smith Nov 19 '12 at 14:48
    
Replaced my code with yours, and it works. Thanks! :) –  Mr. Smith Nov 19 '12 at 15:33
    
I looked into my glDrawElements approach, and I think what's happening is that glDrawElements doesn't select the proper texture coordinates when the indices are not monotonically increasing. Hence glDrawElements is pointless when dealing with textures. Drawing cube using glDrawElements and glTexCoordPointer –  Mr. Smith Nov 19 '12 at 15:40
    
I'm not sure yet what the problem is; I think you should be able to use glDrawElements in this case. One problem may be the use of glVertexPointer -- that's only valid for ES 1.0. –  bosmacs Nov 19 '12 at 15:43
    
Sorry, meant to write glVertexAttribPointer in my code sample (I don't use glVertexPointer). I've edited my original post just now to fix that. –  Mr. Smith Nov 19 '12 at 15:45

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