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I need help in removing letters but not words from an incoming data string. Like the following,

String A = "1 2 3A 4 5C 6 ABCD EFGH 7 8D 9";

to

String A = "1 2 3 4 5 6 ABCD EFGH 7 8 9";
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Is this Homework? –  Steven Nov 19 '12 at 14:16
    
What have you tried? To engage people here you need to show that you are trying to solve the issue yourself. –  RedEyedMonster Nov 19 '12 at 14:18
1  
@Steven: Does it matter? Apart from the usual "what have you tried"? –  Thorsten Dittmar Nov 19 '12 at 14:18
2  
I would use a regular expression. –  Ramhound Nov 19 '12 at 14:19
    
@RedEyedMonster Hello!! I have tried Regex.Replace, but I had to do it individually for each piece of data stored in an individual array (which is done after splitting the string and storing into an array). –  Chaitanya Krishna Reddy Nov 19 '12 at 14:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to match a letter and ensure that there is no letter before and after. So match

(?<!\p{L})\p{L}(?!\p{L})

and replace with an empty string.

In C#:

string s = "1 2 3A 4 5C 6 ABCD EFGH 7 8D 9";
string result = Regex.Replace(s, @"(?<!\p{L}) # Negative lookbehind assertion to ensure not a letter before
                                   \p{L}      # Unicode property, matches a letter in any language
                                   (?!\p{L})  # Negative lookahead assertion to ensure not a letter following
                                  ", String.Empty, RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace);
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1  
+1 for the brilliant and always unreadable regular expressions. –  Steven Nov 19 '12 at 14:21
1  
+1 Since lookaround and posix syntaxes are not universally recognizable even by relatively experienced regex users, you may want to explain that this expression matches any single letter that is neither preceded nor succeeded by another letter. –  dasblinkenlight Nov 19 '12 at 14:24
    
@Stema: Thank You!!! This worked like a charm. –  Chaitanya Krishna Reddy Nov 19 '12 at 14:25
    
@Steven, to show that regex is not unreadable by default I added a commented version. –  stema Nov 19 '12 at 14:27
    
@dasblinkenlight, of course, I added a commented version. –  stema Nov 19 '12 at 14:27

The "obligatory" Linq approach:

string[] words = A.Split();
string result = string.Join(" ", 
        words.Select(w => w.Any(c => Char.IsDigit(c)) ? 
        new string(w.Where(c => Char.IsDigit(c)).ToArray()) : w));

This approach looks if each word contains a digit. Then it filters out the non-digit chars and creates a new string from the result. Otherwise it just takes the word.

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Here's a demo: ideone.com/mjec6c –  Tim Schmelter Nov 19 '12 at 15:01

And here comes the old school:

Dim A As String = "1 2 3A 4 5C 6 ABCD EFGH 7 8D 9"
Dim B As String = "1 2 3 4 5 6 ABCD EFGH 7 8 9"
Dim sb As New StringBuilder
Dim letterCount As Integer = 0
For i = 0 To A.Length - 1
  Dim ch As Char = CStr(A(i)).ToLower
  If ch >= "a" And ch <= "z" Then
    letterCount += 1
  Else
    If letterCount > 1 Then sb.Append(A.Substring(i - letterCount, letterCount))
    letterCount = 0
    sb.Append(A(i))
  End If
Next
Debug.WriteLine(B = sb.ToString) 'prints True
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