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I don't understand the meaning of "258EAFA5-E914-47DA-95CA-C5AB0DC85B11" in RFC 6455. Why does the server need this magic string? And why does the WebSocket protocol need this mechanism?

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The RFC explains it. It is a GUID, selected because it is "unlikely to be used by network endpoints that do not understand the WebSocket Protocol". See RFC 6455.

If you're interested in the specifics of the format for GUIDs like that, see RFC 4122.

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3  
Why does the WebSocket protocol need this mechanism? – Hakju Oh Nov 20 '12 at 7:20
    
@DavidSchwartz I think this is a Globally Unique Identifier used by server to verify whether the coming connection is websocket or not – C graphics Sep 23 '13 at 21:59
    
@DavidSchwartz: Except it does. 1.3 is the plainspoken summary of the mechanism and they are not normative. The technical, exhaustive description of the same mechanism in Section 4.2.2 is normative. The GUID appears under step 5, substep 4. – Jesper Oct 14 '13 at 11:01

From the Quora answer:

There is no reason for choosing the magic string. The particular magic string GUID was chosen to add some level of integrity to the WebSockets protocol, because the string is globally unique.

The RFC (RFC 6455 - The WebSocket Protocol) only says:

...concatenate this with the Globally Unique Identifier (GUID, [RFC4122]) "258EAFA5-E914-47DA-95CA-C5AB0DC85B11" in string form, which is unlikely to be used by network endpoints that do not understand the WebSocket Protocol.

Hope that answers your question.

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