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Often i come across filetypes that have a zip signature but they are not compressed archives or they are simply not zip files; in general there are files that from the signature look like compressed archives but in reality they are just containers for a custom dataset.

For example the .blend files or the .apk can be opened with a archive utility.

With a programmatic approach, how i can create my own new filetype definition avoiding all the complicated bit about creating a new filetype and using a zip as container ?

I'm interested in this for C/C++ programming.


EDIT:

I also would like to stress the fact that I'm talking about containers to avoid platform related issues like the ones about encoding and data representation.

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closed as not a real question by Jan Hudec, Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp, PearsonArtPhoto, Mr. Alien, Pfitz Nov 20 '12 at 7:26

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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AFAIK, .apk is a zip-file. At least zip's container format is used to bundle several files. I'm not sure if compression is enabled additionally. –  Andy Nov 19 '12 at 15:00
    
@Andy that's my point, I'm not interested in compression algorithms, I only want to bundle a bunch of files for settings and give a custom structure to the archive. –  user1824407 Nov 19 '12 at 15:01
    
are you asking how to use zlib? –  nurettin Nov 19 '12 at 15:08
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Well, just pick a library that can work with zip files. Or what is your question? –  Jan Hudec Nov 19 '12 at 15:20
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Ad Edit: You are not avoiding any platform related issues, especially not ones about encoding and data representation, by stashing the data in a zip file. Zip is just a container, but the individual parts still may have those issues. Using zip can make your life easier by allowing you to combine and reuse existing formats and their implementation, but will not solve any problems. –  Jan Hudec Nov 19 '12 at 15:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I suspect you're asking how does one create something exactly like a zip file with a different file extension (which afaik is the tactic used for .APK files for example).

The rather simple answer is you create one of these exactly as you otherwise would and use a file name with your own extension. As mentioned in the comments there are various libraries for creating and processing zip file that you can use.

This file could (like an APK) be opened in an archive utility but by default be associated with some other action on the system (as apk's are associated with installation and .blend is associated with blender).

This technique is extremely common and many common application file formats are little more than a zipped collection of files and some standard index file that shows how they fit together.

Also note @Jan Hudec's comment about encoding issues - there no escaping through this route.

On Encoding: (I suggest you ask a new, different question about these issues - many here would have more hands-on knowledge than me) You mention that you want to get exactly the same data on potentially heterogeneous systems. I think you must use text encoding: there is no guarantee that the type lengths, alignment or representation are alike after your C code compiles on different systems, thus simply writing binary blobs out isn't very reliable.. Try to be as specific as possible when choosing a character set for the text encoding allowing you to match character sets accurately on the other system.

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so there is nothing more than using a zip library ? How I can facilitate or solve problems related to the enconding ? It's better to use binary encoding or text enconding ? –  user1824407 Nov 19 '12 at 15:30
    
Edited my response to the limit of my encoding related knowledge. –  Elemental Nov 19 '12 at 15:37
    
ok, thanks for this. –  user1824407 Nov 19 '12 at 16:25

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