Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a table with some data. For simplicity it looks like:

id - auto_increment
c1 - int
c2 - int
created - date

There might be lots of data

The way I get the data is such:

SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE created >= DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 1 HOUR) ORDER by c1 + c2 DESC LIMIT 10

How to make index for c1 + c2? Is it possible? Should I add it, I mean will it slow the query?

share|improve this question
1  
You want to order by the sum of c1 and c2 columns or do you want to order by both columns? –  bonCodigo Nov 19 '12 at 14:58
    
@bonCodio, I want sum of these columns –  arthur.borisow Nov 19 '12 at 15:01
    
@Dave, what do you mean? –  arthur.borisow Nov 19 '12 at 15:01
    
@arthur.borisow - you've accepted only 35% of the answers to questions you've asked. This is usually an indication that you don't care or don't follow through. You should accept correct answers to questions you've asked in the past to get your "accepted rate" higher. –  Dave Nov 19 '12 at 15:22

1 Answer 1

You can just create a index with both fields. Something like:

ALTER TABLE my_table ADD INDEX sumC1C2 (c1,c2)
share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand the negative. If you have an index for both, to fetch the values will be faster and then it will be less performance problems. –  fiso Nov 19 '12 at 15:57
    
Not me downvoting, but I suspect the index won't make much (positive) difference. The query can filter on created to filter the number of rows down, but then has to pick the values out of the index row by row to do the sum anyway (the index isn't on the sum, but on the parts), most likely not faster than just doing it out of the table right away. –  Joachim Isaksson Nov 19 '12 at 16:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.