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I have a tab delimited file which looks like this

chr1  12226559  12227059  TNFRSF1B       
chr1  17051560  17052060                 
chr1  17053279  17053779                 
chr1  17338423  17338923  ATP13A2        
                          ATP13A2        
                          ATP13A2        
chr1  19577574  19578074  EMC1           
                          MRTO4          
chr1  19578046  19578546  EMC1           
                          MRTO4          
chr1  19638239  19638739  AKR7A2         
                          PQLC2          
                          PQLC2          
                          PQLC2
                          AKR7A2         
                          PQLC2     

I want that the lines where value of column4 is repeated should be removed.

First three columns are co ordinates and in those co-ordinates whatever we find is listed (in col4), and for each co-ordinate I want to have only unique names and not the repeatation of names.

I want an output like this

chr1  12226559  12227059  TNFRSF1B       
chr1  17051560  17052060                 
chr1  17053279  17053779                 
chr1  17338423  17338923  ATP13A2              
chr1  19577574  19578074  EMC1           
                          MRTO4          
chr1  19578046  19578546  EMC1           
                          MRTO4          
chr1  19638239  19638739  AKR7A2         
                          PQLC2 

Things that I have tried

sort -k 4 -u file

awk '{if($4==temp1){next;}else{print}temp1=$4}' file

Nothing works :(

Please help

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
I'm sure your awk script will work if you change the field separator to a tab. Otherwise awk separates words on runs of white space. –  user5402 Nov 19 '12 at 15:07
    
+1 for sample data, required output and attempts at solution. Good luck. –  shellter Nov 19 '12 at 15:08
    
+1 I spent good time solving your challenge ;-) –  olibre Nov 19 '12 at 15:45
    
@olibre still unsolved :( –  Angelo Nov 19 '12 at 15:53
    
@Angelo @dogbane Consider 3 lines: first one is empty expect AKR7A2 at the end; the second one is filled chr1 19638239 19638739 AKR7A2; and the third one is same as the first one. What is the line that should be kept? From your question requirements, we should keep the first one (the empty one). But my feeling would keep the second one (the filled one). Please give your opinion ;-) Cheers –  olibre Nov 20 '12 at 8:30

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You just need

awk '$NF != prev {print} {prev=$NF}'

EDIT: to handle the new input

awk '{
    if (NF == 1) 
        value = $1
    else {
        key =  $1 SUBSEP $2 SUBSEP $3
        value = $4
    }
    if ((key SUBSEP value) in val) 
        next
    print
    val[key, value] = 1
}' input
share|improve this answer
    
If you're into code golf, you can take advantage of the default action (print): awk '$NF!=p;{p=$NF}' –  glenn jackman Nov 19 '12 at 18:00
    
+1 Exactly what I'd do. –  Steve Nov 19 '12 at 21:25
    
+1 Ditto. It's the right solution. –  Ed Morton Nov 20 '12 at 3:41
    
Excellent :) :) :) –  Angelo Nov 20 '12 at 8:43
    
@ glenn jackman Please have a look at a different input, I did change the input. –  Angelo Nov 20 '12 at 8:54
sed '1{x;d};H;x;s/\([ ][^\n ]*\)[ ]*\n[ ]*\1[ ]*\n/\1\n/;$p;x;d;$p;x;d' FILE

If you have tabs in your file, apart from spaces, you can replace all [ ] with [[:space:]].

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Very good performance have managed this challenge by using only a sed script! congratulations ;-) –  olibre Nov 20 '12 at 8:48
    
I also written a sed interpretor [The semantics is not finished, only syntax], and I will integrate it in gnu/Emacs in future: lists.gnu.org/archive/html/emacs-devel/2011-05/msg00745.html –  alinsoar Nov 20 '12 at 9:36
    
What a pity I do not use emacs in my new job... I hope your lisp script will be included in an official release... good luck ;-) PS: you still use voila.fr! (please accept my edit in your answer) –  olibre Nov 20 '12 at 10:57

simple awk script

awk -F'\t' '{OFS="\t"; if ($4=="" || $4!=old) print; old=$4}' input.txt

result

chr1    12226559        12227059        TNFRSF1B
chr1    17051560        17052060
chr1    17053279        17053779
chr1    17338423        17338923        ATP13A2
chr1    19577574        19578074        EMC1
                                        MRTO4
chr1    19578046        19578546        EMC1
                                        MRTO4
chr1    19638239        19638739        AKR7A2
                                        PQLC2

cleaning

To prepare my input.txt file I copied the text from the question. But I had to replace spaces by tabs. Therefore I used a sed command. I also noticed some trailing spaces (at the end of the line). Finally, I used the following sed command to clean the imput file:

sed 's/ *$//;/^[^ ]/s/  */\t/g;/^ /s/  */\t\t\t/g;' copy-fron-so.txt > input.txt

input file from @dogbane comment

chr1  12226559  12227059  TNFRSF1B
chr1  17051560  17052060
chr1  17053279  17053779
chr1  17338423  17338923  ATP13A2
                          ATP13A2
                          ATP13A2
chr1  19577574  19578074  EMC1
                          MRTO4
chr1  19578046  19578546  EMC1
                          MRTO4
chr1  19638239  19638739  AKR7A2
                          PQLC2
                          PQLC2
                          PQLC2
                          AKR7A2

(the last line have been appended)

cleaning and processing

$> sed 's/ *$//;/^[^ ]/s/  */\t/g;/^ /s/  */\t\t\t/g;' copypaste.txt > input.txt
$> awk -F'\t' '{OFS="\t"; if ($4=="" || $4!=old) print; old=$4}' input.txt
chr1    12226559        12227059        TNFRSF1B
chr1    17051560        17052060
chr1    17053279        17053779
chr1    17338423        17338923        ATP13A2
chr1    19577574        19578074        EMC1
                                        MRTO4
chr1    19578046        19578546        EMC1
                                        MRTO4
chr1    19638239        19638739        AKR7A2
                                        PQLC2
                                        AKR7A2

requirements change

The last line having AKR7A2 should not be printed. Therefore we need first to sort the input.txt file. Caution the option -t is for introducing a tab, on bash or vi press [CTRL-V], then [TAB] (put quotes around this tab).

$> LANG=C sort -k 4 -s -t ' ' input.txt > sorted.txt 
$> awk -F'\t' '{OFS="\t"; if ($4=="" || $4!=old) print; old=$4}' sorted.txt
chr1    17051560        17052060
chr1    17053279        17053779
chr1    19638239        19638739        AKR7A2
chr1    17338423        17338923        ATP13A2
chr1    19577574        19578074        EMC1
                                        MRTO4
                                        PQLC2
chr1    12226559        12227059        TNFRSF1B

Note that there is a single line ending with MRTO4 now!

share|improve this answer
    
Are sure of this awk command or did you use the correct input. This script with my sample input will not give this output. :( –  Angelo Nov 19 '12 at 15:50
    
Yes I copy-pasted your input and did some cleaning: removing consecutive spaces, replacing them by tabs, removing trailing spaces... I am appending in my answer what I did to clean the input file... –  olibre Nov 19 '12 at 15:54
    
This won't work if the fourth column is not sorted. –  dogbane Nov 19 '12 at 16:10
1  
Hi @dogbane. Forth column does not need to be sorted. Have a look at the result output, there are two lines ending with MRTO4. And this is correct as specified in the question example, isn't it? –  olibre Nov 19 '12 at 16:13
1  
@olibre I meant your code assumes that the fourth column is sorted within each "chr1" block. For example, try adding another AKR7A2 right at the end of the input file. Your script will then print out two AKR7A2 instead of one. –  dogbane Nov 19 '12 at 16:24

Perhaps the following will help:

use strict;
use warnings;

my %seen;

while (<DATA>) {
    my ($col3) = (split)[-1];
    print if !$seen{$col3}++ or !$col3;
}

__DATA__
chr1    12226559    12227059    TNFRSF1B
chr1    17051560    17052060    
chr1    17053279    17053779    
chr1    17338423    17338923    ATP13A2
                                ATP13A2
                                ATP13A2
chr1    19577574    19578074    EMC1
                                MRTO4
chr1    19578046    19578546    EMC1
                                MRTO4
chr1    19638239    19638739    AKR7A2
                                PQLC2
                                PQLC2
                                PQLC2

Output:

chr1    12226559    12227059    TNFRSF1B
chr1    17051560    17052060    
chr1    17053279    17053779    
chr1    17338423    17338923    ATP13A2
chr1    19577574    19578074    EMC1
                                MRTO4
chr1    19638239    19638739    AKR7A2
                                PQLC2

This output can also be achieved with the following one-liner:

perl -ane "print if !$X{$F[-1]}++ or !$F[-1]" data.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Hi @Kenosis I did not reach to test your perl scripts. I use perl v5.8.8. On first script, I have this output: Name "main::DATA" used only once: possible typo at -e line 6.\n readline() on unopened filehandle DATA at -e line 6.. On the second tiny script, this output: syntax error at -e line 1, near "++ or"\n Execution of -e aborted due to compilation errors.. Please can you give more information how to solve that? Cheers ;-) –  olibre Nov 20 '12 at 8:55
    
@kenoisis output is not correct. –  Angelo Nov 20 '12 at 9:00

Using a tiny perl script:

perl -e 'my $col4 = "";
while (<>) {
  chomp;
  my @f = split(/\t/, $_);
  if ($f[3] eq "" || $f[3] ne $col4) {
    print $_, "\n";
  }
  $col4 = $f[3];
}' input.txt

result:

chr1    12226559        12227059        TNFRSF1B
chr1    17051560        17052060
chr1    17053279        17053779
chr1    17338423        17338923        ATP13A2
chr1    19577574        19578074        EMC1
                                        MRTO4
chr1    19578046        19578546        EMC1
                                        MRTO4
chr1    19638239        19638739        AKR7A2
                                        PQLC2
share|improve this answer
1  
Please add \n in your print, else all the output is printed in a single line. Moreover the perl script prints two successive lines ending with ATP13A2. Finally the script prints solely the first of successive lines having empty forth column (all should be printed), same drawback as uniq -f4. Good luck for corrections... –  olibre Nov 19 '12 at 15:18
    
Corrections made. –  user5402 Nov 19 '12 at 15:56
    
+1 Perfect, your script meets the question requirements. However, @dogbane added another requirements => please read from the middle of my answer... cheers ;-) –  olibre Nov 20 '12 at 8:39

Given the newly posted input I'd use:

gawk -F'\t' '!/^\t/{delete a} !a[$4]++' file

I use gawk so I can clearly delete the whole array at one time, with other awks use the less clear:

awk -F'\t' '!/^\t/{split("",a)} !a[$4]++' file
share|improve this answer

If the repeated lines are duplicated in all columns and not just the fourth, uniq(1) is probably suitable. Try running just uniq file and see if the output is what you expect.

share|improve this answer
    
Well I want the command to look for repetition in only a segment like repetition in this segment chr1 17338423 17338923 ATP13A2 ATP13A2 ATP13A2 –  Angelo Nov 19 '12 at 15:05

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