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I've recently received a very good answer as how to overload specific class members by deriving classes.

The issue now is that one of the members is in fact templated with specializations either being BaseClass, DerivedClass or Derived2Class

#include <iostream>

using std::cin;
using std::cout;
using std::endl;


template<class T>
class Queue
{
    public:
        Queue();
        Queue(T*);
}

class Com
{
    public:
        virtual void setReady()
        {
            cout << "Com" << endl;
        }
};

class DerivedCom : public Com
{
    public:
        void setReady()
        {
            cout << "DCom" << endl;
        }
};

class Derived2Com : public Com
{
    public:
        void setReady()
        {
            cout << "D2Com" << endl;
        }
};

class BaseClass
{
    protected:
        Com* com;
        Queue<BaseClass>* queue;

    public:
        BaseClass(Com* c = new Com, Queue<BaseClass>* q = new Queue<BaseClass>) : com(c), queue(q)
        {
        }

        void setReady()
        {
            com->setReady();
        }
};

class DerivedClass : public BaseClass
{
    public:
        DerivedClass() : BaseClass(new DerivedCom, new Queue<DerivedClass>) 
        {
        }
};

class Derived2Class : public BaseClass
{
    public:
        Derived2Class() : BaseClass(new Derived2Com, new Queue<Derived2Class>) 
        {}
};

int main()
{
    BaseClass* base = new Derived2Class();

    base->setReady();
    return 0;
}

I can, without problem, "overload" simple classes like Com, DerivedCom and Derived2Com but the constructor signature of BaseClass won't fit to the type the deriving classes are trying to send it.

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If this is just simple mistake that * is missing before q in BaseClass(Com* c = new Com, Queue<BaseClass> q = new Queue<BaseClass>) then correct it. But this will not solve your problems... –  PiotrNycz Nov 19 '12 at 15:33
    
The crux is that Queue<DerivedClass> does not derive from Queue<BaseClass> –  Mooing Duck Nov 4 '14 at 19:57

3 Answers 3

Instead of Queue<BaseClass>* queue; you should have Queue<BaseClass*> queue; or, even better, Queue<std::unique_ptr<BaseClass>> and initialize it only in the base constructor:

BaseClass(Com* c = new Com, Queue<BaseClass*> q = Queue<BaseClass*>()) : com(c), queue(q)
{
}

However having the BaseClass hold a collection of itself as a member is a code smell. I'd re-think that part.

The reason it's not working is that Queue<BaseClass> and Queue<DerivedClass> are completely different classes.

share|improve this answer
    
Queue never instantiates the class it's being handled, it's just a wrapper for a method invocation queue: pastie.org/5401518. That way I can postpone method calls, i.e. using queue->push(&BaseClass::setReady); and call them later on using queue->pop() –  Nils Werner Nov 19 '12 at 15:21
    
@NilsWerner I don't see how that's relevant. –  Luchian Grigore Nov 19 '12 at 15:26
    
Yup, it's not. I just wanted to show that there is a reason why I am doing it. –  Nils Werner Nov 19 '12 at 15:29

You should actually have Queue<BaseClass*>* queue = new Queue<BaseClass*>(); This declares a Queue pointer of type BaseClass pointer on the heap and allows you to use the pointer notation you mentioned above as queue->push(&BaseClass::setReady); and such...

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-1 because there's no need for queue to be allocated with new. –  Luchian Grigore Nov 19 '12 at 16:00
    
and while that may be true.....I was just saying he needed to referring to a pointer to the queue since he was using pointer notation, so Im sorry, but it MUST be a pointer in order for that to work, much less compile. I appreciate the minus 1 for you misunderstanding my response... –  Tyler S Nov 24 '12 at 2:56

Following an answer found elsewhere I changed the concept of class Queue to be template-less.

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