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Typically, the solution to for..in's notorious caveat is something along the lines of:

for(var prop in obj) {
    if(obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
        foo(); bar(); baz();
    }
}

I feel like it would be cleaner to just do:

for(var prop in obj) {
    if(!obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) continue;
}

The question is... Are they not functionally identical?

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2  
I think it's a matter of taste or style. –  Pointy Nov 19 '12 at 15:12
2  
they are identical as much as the code logic is concerned (they may be different by performance or something else). I prefer the second version because you get rid of a layer of indentation –  Gabi Purcaru Nov 19 '12 at 15:13
    
It is a matter of style and preference. The first positive example makes more sense to me. If this, then do that. seems more meaningful than the negative If not this, do nothing –  Michael Berkowski Nov 19 '12 at 15:13
1  
@GabiPurcaru If you'd have made an answer of that, I'd have accepted it. –  wwaawaw Nov 19 '12 at 15:16
1  
@adlwalrus I said may be different performance-wise. I won't post an answer when I'm not sure I'm right –  Gabi Purcaru Nov 19 '12 at 15:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

They are functionally identical. Period.

As for the matter of style, Douglas and his JSLint say: don't use continue:

Avoid use of the continue statement. It tends to obscure the control flow of the function.

See http://javascript.crockford.com/code.html and search for "continue"

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2  
Jesus christ, I hate crockford and his fearmongering. –  wwaawaw Nov 19 '12 at 15:22
1  
Indeed. It obscures the control flow of the function only for those incapable of basic reading. Which, admittedly, covers a big chunk of the JS userbase... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 19 '12 at 15:31
1  
@adlwalrus: Crockford also seems to contradict Douglas on var declarations and spacing before the brackets in function declarations function foo() {...} versus function bar () {...}, to name a few. I think it really comes down to personal preference in these cases. (javascript.crockford.com/code.html#variable%20declarations) –  Cerbrus Nov 20 '12 at 7:46
1  
@Cerbrus There's no contradiction. Spacing before brackets, according to JSLint, is encouraged when the function literal is anonymous, such as function () {}. The reasoning behind this is quite solid and deserves a quote: "If the space is omitted, then it can appear that the function's name is function, which is an incorrect reading." I would also like to note, that this discussion went a bit outside of the scope of the question. Let's stop it at this point. Thanks. –  Oleg Nov 20 '12 at 8:31

Yes, they are functionally identical.


I'd say the continue-less example is a little more semantic, though.

In the first example, you aren't negating the bool in your if, so, you have a typical
if(property){"Execute the rest of this loop"}
instead of
if(not property){"Do not execute the rest of this loop"}

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