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I'm doing some bitshifting work in C, and I'm reading in unsigned char's. Does every function I use with those variables need to take in an unsigned char as input, or because I loaded the value as unsigned will it automatically keep the first bit positive?

Essentially do I need to do:

int Test1(unsigned char input1)
{
...
}

for everything, or will:

int Test2(char input2)
{
...
}

suffice? Thanks.

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Don't be tempted to lie to the compiler. If you read in unsigned char's than type them as unsigned chars in your code. –  C Johnson Nov 19 '12 at 15:27
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

int Test2(char input2) might not work. As largest unsigned char is greater than largest signed char(largest positive integer in the range).

But!

Since both unsigned char and signed char are of same size, whether you read it as signed char or unsigned char what is stored in the memory is the same. Only the interpretation is different when you access them.

Also char var does not mean that it is a signed char. It actually depends on compiler flags. Read here.

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It will not change the value, but it could be interpreted differently, so it really depends on what you want to do inside the functions, for example:

unsigned char c = 255;

void Test1(unsigned char c)
{
    printf("%d\n", (c>100)); //prints 1
    printf("%d\n",  (unsigned char)c); //prints 255
}

void Test2(char c)
{
    printf("%d\n", (c>100)); //prints 0
    printf("%d\n",  (unsigned char)c); //prints 255
}
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The largest possible unsigned char value is bigger than the largest possible signed char value (because you effectively need one bit's worth of information for the sign).

So, some legal unsigned char values in the first function won't be representable as a signed char when passed to the second. Does it really matter whether they get somehow truncated, or turn negative? They're obviously going to get damaged in some way.

Keep your types the same unless you're deliberately coercing them for some reason (eg, check your unsigned char is representable as a char). There may be exceptions where you have special knowledge about the contents, of course.

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