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I've got a multi collumn data file. Let's say I need to only plot the 4th number from the 13th line. This works well with the following piece of code:

plot 'datafile' u (some fix x-value):($0==13? $4 :1/0) with points

Now I would like to plot the average of these numbers from the 13th and from the 11th line. Something like this:

plot 'datafile' u (some fix x-value):( ($4(line11)+$4(line13.))/2 ) with points

As far as I know theres no way to address both lines in gnuplot, right? Can I use awk or sed in gnuplot to do it? Maybe to store value from line 11 in a variable that can be used in a function of line 13?

Thank you very much in advance for your kind help!

Best wishes, Tob

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I havent used gnuplot for a longer time but it was always a bad choice for complex dataprocessing (see their faq ). I've used simple scripts (python or octave in such circumstances, sometimes grep/awk) and have one original datafile and several derived files, eg. datafile_average. Make is your friend ;) –  Peter Schneider Nov 19 '12 at 15:30
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1 Answer 1

I haven't used gnuplot in a very, VERY long time and all I really remember about it is that I used to rely pretty heavily on awk to parse the data files. To get the 4th "number" (I assume you mean field/column) from the 13th line in awk would just be:

awk 'NR==13{print $4}' datafile

and to get the averages of the values from the 4th field in the 11th and 13th lines would be:

awk 'NR~/^(11|13)$/{sum+=$4} END{print sum/2}' datafile

Now if someone can tell you how to use awk's output in gnuplot (sorry, I just don't remember) then you're in business.

EDIT: a quick google of gnuplot and awk showed up this:

gnuplot> plot "<awk '{x=x+$2; print $1,x}' file1.dat" with boxes

from http://security.riit.tsinghua.edu.cn/~bhyang/ref/gnuplot/datafile3-e.html plus several other examples. HTH.

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It was plot "<awk ..." –  Bernhard Nov 20 '12 at 15:06
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