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I am executing my a.out file. After execution the program runs for some time then exits with the message:

**** stack smashing detected ***: ./a.out terminated*
*======= Backtrace: =========*
*/lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc.so.6(__fortify_fail+0x48)Aborted*

What could be the possible reasons for this and how do I rectify it?

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Could you perhaps identify which parts of you code causes the stack smashing, and post it? Then we will probably be able to point out exactly why it happens and how to correct it. –  Bjarke Freund-Hansen Aug 30 '09 at 8:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 114 down vote accepted

Stack Smashing here is actually caused due to a protection mechanism used by gcc to detect buffer overflow errors. For example in the following snippet:

#include <stdio.h>

void func()
{
    char array[10];
    gets(array);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    func();
}

The compiler, (in this case gcc) adds protection variables (called canaries) which have known values. An input string of size greater than 10 causes corruption of this variable resulting in SIGABRT to terminate the program.

To get some insight, you can try disabling this protection of gcc using option -fno-stack-protector while compiling. In that case you will get a different error, most likely a segmentation fault as you are trying to access an illegal memory location.

You can get some information about the point of overflow by running the program with a debugger. Valgrind doesn't work well with stack-related errors, but like a debugger, it may help you pin-point the location and reason for the crash.

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thanks for this answer! I found that in my case I had not initialized the variable I was trying to write to –  Ted Pennings Jun 13 '12 at 0:16
2  
Valgrind doesn't work well for stack-related errors, since it can't add red zones there –  toasted_flakes Jan 7 at 10:35
2  
This answer is incorrect, and provides dangerous advice. First of all, removing stack protector is not the right solution -- if you are getting a stack smashing error, you probably have a serious security vulnerability in your code. The correct response is to fix the buggy code. Second, as grasGendarme points out, the recommendation to try Valgrind is not going to be effective. Valgrind typically doesn't work for detecting illegal memory accesses to stack-allocated data. –  D.W. Feb 9 at 2:16
2  
The OP asks for possible reasons for this behaviour, my answer provides an example and how it relates to a reasonably known error. Besides, removing the stack-protector is not a solution, it is sort of an experiment one could do to get more insights to the problem. The advice actually is to fix the error somehow, thanks for pointing about valgrind, i will edit my answer to reflect this. –  sud03r Feb 9 at 9:14
1  
@D.W. the stack protection should be turned off in a release version, because at first -- the stack smashing detected message is a help only for a developers; at second -- an application could have yet chances to survive; and at third -- this is a tiny optimization. –  Hi-Angel Jun 4 at 12:44

Your buffer variable is only allowing 20 characters, your argument is 23, increase your buffer to support your argument...

char buffer[20];
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You could try to debug the problem using valgrind:

The Valgrind distribution currently includes six production-quality tools: a memory error detector, two thread error detectors, a cache and branch-prediction profiler, a call-graph generating cache profiler, and a heap profiler. It also includes two experimental tools: a heap/stack/global array overrun detector, and a SimPoint basic block vector generator. It runs on the following platforms: X86/Linux, AMD64/Linux, PPC32/Linux, PPC64/Linux, and X86/Darwin (Mac OS X).

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Yeah, but Valgrind doesn't work well for overflows of stack-allocated buffers, which is the situation that this error message indicates. –  D.W. Feb 9 at 2:17
    
How could we use that stack array overrun detector? Can you elaborate? –  Craig McQueen Mar 18 at 0:54

Please see this situation.

ab@cd-x:$ cat test_overflow.c 
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int check_password(char *password){
    int flag = 0;
    char buffer[20];
    strcpy(buffer, password);

    if(strcmp(buffer, "mypass") == 0){
        flag = 1;
    }
    if(strcmp(buffer, "yourpass") == 0){
        flag = 1;
    }
    return flag;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    if(argc >= 2){
        if(check_password(argv[1])){
            printf("%s", "Access grainted\n");
        }else{
            printf("%s", "Access denined\n");
        }
    }else{
        printf("%s", "Please enter password!\n");
    }
}
ab@cd-x:$ gcc -g -fno-stack-protector test_overflow.c 
ab@cd-x:$ ./a.out mypass
Access grainted
ab@cd-x:$ ./a.out yourpass
Access grainted
ab@cd-x:$ ./a.out wepass
Access denined
ab@cd-x:$ ./a.out wepassssssssssssssssss
Access grainted

ab@cd-x:$ gcc -g -fstack-protector test_overflow.c 
ab@cd-x:$ ./a.out wepass
Access denined
ab@cd-x:$ ./a.out mypass
Access grainted
ab@cd-x:$ ./a.out yourpass
Access grainted
ab@cd-x:$ ./a.out wepassssssssssssssssss
*** stack smashing detected ***: ./a.out terminated
======= Backtrace: =========
/lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc.so.6(__fortify_fail+0x48)[0xce0ed8]
/lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc.so.6(__fortify_fail+0x0)[0xce0e90]
./a.out[0x8048524]
./a.out[0x8048545]
/lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xe6)[0xc16b56]
./a.out[0x8048411]
======= Memory map: ========
007d9000-007f5000 r-xp 00000000 08:06 5776       /lib/libgcc_s.so.1
007f5000-007f6000 r--p 0001b000 08:06 5776       /lib/libgcc_s.so.1
007f6000-007f7000 rw-p 0001c000 08:06 5776       /lib/libgcc_s.so.1
0090a000-0090b000 r-xp 00000000 00:00 0          [vdso]
00c00000-00d3e000 r-xp 00000000 08:06 1183       /lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc-2.10.1.so
00d3e000-00d3f000 ---p 0013e000 08:06 1183       /lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc-2.10.1.so
00d3f000-00d41000 r--p 0013e000 08:06 1183       /lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc-2.10.1.so
00d41000-00d42000 rw-p 00140000 08:06 1183       /lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc-2.10.1.so
00d42000-00d45000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
00e0c000-00e27000 r-xp 00000000 08:06 4213       /lib/ld-2.10.1.so
00e27000-00e28000 r--p 0001a000 08:06 4213       /lib/ld-2.10.1.so
00e28000-00e29000 rw-p 0001b000 08:06 4213       /lib/ld-2.10.1.so
08048000-08049000 r-xp 00000000 08:05 1056811    /dos/hacking/test/a.out
08049000-0804a000 r--p 00000000 08:05 1056811    /dos/hacking/test/a.out
0804a000-0804b000 rw-p 00001000 08:05 1056811    /dos/hacking/test/a.out
08675000-08696000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0          [heap]
b76fe000-b76ff000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
b7717000-b7719000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
bfc1c000-bfc31000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0          [stack]
Aborted
ab@cd-x:$ 

When I disable smashing stack protector there is a case to make my program error. What happen when I used "./a.out wepassssssssssssssssss"

So above to your question the message "** stack smashing detected : xxx" was displayed because smashing stack protector is active and found that there is stack overflow in your program.

Just find out and fix it.

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5  
there are many misspell in my program –  bugbug Mar 6 '10 at 6:51

It means that you wrote to some variables on the stack in an illegal way, most likely as the result of a Buffer overflow.

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12  
Is it...a stack overflow?!?!?!. Zomg. –  MattC Aug 28 '09 at 9:08
3  
Sorry, it's 5:00 AM and I had to. –  MattC Aug 28 '09 at 9:09
6  
Stack overflow is the stack smashing into something else. Here it is the other way around: something has smashed into the stack. –  Peter Mortensen Aug 28 '09 at 9:27
2  
Not really. It's one part of the stack smashing into another part. So it really is a buffer overflow, just not over the top of stack, but "only" into another part of the stack. –  Bas Wijnen Nov 30 '12 at 7:48

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