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Given the following interface:

public interface IEventHandler<in TEvent> where TEvent : IEvent
{
    void Process(TEvent @event);
}

What IEnumerable type can I use to store a collection of IEventHandler<TEvent> implementations where TEvent is different?

i.e. Given the following 3 implementations:

public class BlahEvent1EventHandler : IEventHandler<Event1>
{
    ...
}

public class WhateverEvent1EventHandler : IEventHandler<Event1>
{
    ...
}

public class BlahEvent2EventHandler : IEventHandler<Event2>
{
    ...
}

Can I do any better than a collection of objects?

        var handlers = new List<object>
                           {
                               new BlahEvent1EventHandler(),
                               new WhateverEvent1EventHandler(),
                               new BlahEvent2EventHandler(),
                           };

BTW, have seen some other answers advocating the use of a base type or inherited non-generic interface but cannot see how that would add a huge amount of value in this case unless I am missing something. Yes, it would let me add them all to the collection in a slightly more type safe way that using object, but would not let me iterate over them and call the strongly typed Process method without casting just as I need to do with object.

public interface IEventHandler
{        
}

public interface IEventHandler<in TEvent> : IEventHandler where TEvent : IEvent
{
    void Process(TEvent @event);
}

I still need to cast if I have IEnumerable<IEventHandler> or IEnumerable<obect>

foreach (var handler in _handlers.Cast<IEventHandler<TEvent>>())
{
    handler.Process(@event);
}

Any thoughts on how to improve this?

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I don't think there's a way around. Would gladly hear some interesting inputs on this, as I run in the same issue almost everyday. –  Nicolas Repiquet Nov 19 '12 at 15:27
    
Protip: don't name your variables the same as language keywords. –  tomfanning Nov 19 '12 at 15:27
1  
Since items of different types in the list would require the call of a different Process methods with different argument types, how would you call them? Note that no method overload resolution would occur here, since the type of a list element is only known at runtime. The purpose of generics is provide a static type known at compile time. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Nov 19 '12 at 16:05
    
Why does the interface need to be strongly typed down to the specific event type? Wouldn't void Process(IEvent evt) be sufficient? –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Nov 19 '12 at 16:17
    
@Olivier - was trying not to complicate things but I have a Func<IEvent, IEnumerable<object>> eventHandlerFactory which is injected in to my class and used later to resolve the handlers given a generic type so I do know the type at runtime and this is what I use to Cast - See the last code block in question. It works perfectly. The only issue is the fact that I currently need to declare the Func as returning IEnumerable<object>. –  Paul Hiles Nov 19 '12 at 17:17
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3 Answers

I think the best approach here is to use the OfType extension method and keep your List, assuming the type of the event is known at compile time; there will still be a cast, but you will not be doing it and you will only get the entries that can actually handle that event.

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Probably your design is not optimal. Try to move all code requiring an event type specific behavior to the events, instead of implementing it in the event handler. I.e. let polymorphism work for you.

public interface IEventHandler
{
    void Process(IEvent evt);
}

As an example let's assume that you need to create a message depending on event specific properties. Instead of constructing the message inside of the event handler, construct it in the event

public interface IEvent
{
    string Message { get; }
    ...
}

A specific event

public class TestEvent : IEvent
{
    public string A { get; set; } // Event specific property
    public string B { get; set; } // Event specific property

    public string Message { get { return String.Format("{0} {1}", A, B); } }
    // The event handler does not need to access A or B.
}

UPDATE

Let's assume that there was a way of defining a list the way you intend

var handlers = new List<?>();

How would you cast?

var handler = handlers[i];
// How to cast?
((?)handler).Process((?)evt);

Maybe a better way would be to have one list per event type

public static class EventHandler<in TEvent> : IEventHandler<TEvent>
    where TEvent : IEvent
{
    public static readonly List<IEventHandler<TEvent>> Handlers =
        new List<IEventHandler<TEvent>>();

    ...
}

Then you can access an event handler like this

SpecificEventType specEvent = ...;
EventHandler<SpecificEventType>.Handlers[0].Process(specEvent);

UPDATE #2

A completely different solution creates a new collection class that encapsulates the weakly typed list and provides a strongly typed interface by using generic methods

public class HandlerCollection : IEnumerable
{
    private readonly List<object> _handlers = new List<object>();

    public void Add<TEvent>(IEventHandler<TEvent> handler)
        where TEvent : IEvent
    {
        _handlers.Add(handler);
    }

    public IEventHandler<TEvent> Find<TEvent>()
        where TEvent : IEvent
    {
        return _handlers
            .OfType<IEventHandler<TEvent>>()
            .FirstOrDefault();
    }

    public IEventHandler<TEvent> Find<TEvent>(Func<IEventHandler<TEvent>, bool> predicate)
        where TEvent : IEvent
    {
        return _handlers
            .OfType<IEventHandler<TEvent>>()
            .Where(predicate)
            .FirstOrDefault();
    }

    // Collection initializers can only be applied to types implementing IEnumerable
    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _handlers.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

Test

var handlers = new HandlerCollection {
                   new BlahEvent1EventHandler(),
                   new WhateverEvent1EventHandler(),
                   new BlahEvent2EventHandler()
               };
IEventHandler<WhateverEvent1> eh = handlers.Find<WhateverEvent1>();
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This seems to negate the decoupling aspect of using events in the first place. There could be multiple event handlers processing a single event and to add a new action, all that is required is a new eventhandler class that automatically gets picked up by the IoC container. Nice and clean and SOLID. With your approach, the event class needs to know everything and handling an event inan additional way involves modifying the event class. Not sure I like this. –  Paul Hiles Nov 19 '12 at 17:48
    
@The Flower Guy: Ok, but how are you going to call the right event handler if it depends on the event type? You will need to have a switch statement that covers all event types. Not very object oriented. Different event handlers can still decide to use the Message or not, but should not depend on A or B. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Nov 19 '12 at 17:59
    
That's what the Func<IEvent, IEnumerable<object>> eventHandlerFactory is for. Pass it the event and you will get back a collection of compatible event handlers so you can just loop through them. The issue is that this factory is injected into the class for use later on when an event is actually raised and handled. I need to inject the Func at startup. The Func is basically just a way to avoid injecting the actual IoC container which a lot of domain event implementations seem to do. –  Paul Hiles Nov 19 '12 at 18:04
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If you need enumerate through your handlers and call its Process interface member, then you can implement your classes like this:

public class BlahEvent1EventHandler : IEventHandler<IEvent>
{
    ...
}

public class WhateverEvent1EventHandler : IEventHandler<IEvent>
{
    ...
}

public class BlahEvent2EventHandler : IEventHandler<IEvent>
{
    ...
}

public class Event1 : IEvent
{}

public class Event2 : IEvent
{}

Then use them:

List<IEventHandler<IEvent>> list = new List<IEventHandler<IEvent>>();

list.Add(new BlahEvent1EventHandler());

foreach (IEventHandler<IEvent> eventHandler in list)
{
eventHandler.Process(new Event1());
}
share|improve this answer
    
The event handlers need the strongly typed event so I cannot inherit from IEventHandler<IEvent>. This would require me to cast in every handler. –  Paul Hiles Nov 19 '12 at 15:38
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