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I have a table in MySql 5 of phone numbers. The simple structure is

Accounts
id varchar(32) NOT NULL

The records are as follows

27100070000
27100070001
27100070002
27100070003
27100070004
27100070005
27100070008
27100070009
27100070012
27100070015
27100070016
27100070043

I need to sort through this data and group contiguous blocks of numbers into number ranges. I'm open to implementing the solution in C# LINQ but server-side MySql is first prize. Is there a way in MySql to get this data summarised so that the output is as below?

Start       | End
-------------------------
27100070000 | 27100070005
27100070008 | 27100070009
27100070012 | 27100070015
27100070016 | NULL
27100070043 | NULL
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I don't know about SQL, but With PHP (or any of the cousins indeed) that is trivial. –  Majid Fouladpour Nov 19 '12 at 15:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There is a simple trick to collapse consecutive entries into a single group. If you group by (row_number - entry), the entries that are consecutive will end up in the same group. Here is an example demonstrating what I mean:

Query:

SELECT phonenum, @curRow := @curRow + 1 AS row_number, phonenum - @curRow
from phonenums p
join (SELECT @curRow := 0) r

Results:

|    PHONENUM | ROW_NUMBER | PHONENUM - @CURROW |
-------------------------------------------------
| 27100070000 |          1 |        27100069999 |
| 27100070001 |          2 |        27100069999 |
| 27100070002 |          3 |        27100069999 |
| 27100070003 |          4 |        27100069999 |
| 27100070004 |          5 |        27100069999 |
| 27100070005 |          6 |        27100069999 |
| 27100070008 |          7 |        27100070001 |
| 27100070009 |          8 |        27100070001 |
| 27100070012 |          9 |        27100070003 |
| 27100070015 |         10 |        27100070005 |
| 27100070016 |         11 |        27100070005 |
| 27100070040 |         12 |        27100070028 |

Notice how the entries that are consecutive all have the same value for PHONENUM - @CURROW. If we group on that column, and select the min & max of each group, you have the summary (with one exception: you could replace the END value with NULL if START = END if that's a requirement):

Query:

select min(phonenum), max(phonenum) from
(
  SELECT phonenum, @curRow := @curRow + 1 AS row_number
  from phonenums p
  join (SELECT @curRow := 0) r
) p
group by phonenum - row_number

Results:

| MIN(PHONENUM) | MAX(PHONENUM) |
---------------------------------
|   27100070000 |   27100070005 |
|   27100070008 |   27100070009 |
|   27100070012 |   27100070012 |
|   27100070015 |   27100070016 |
|   27100070040 |   27100070040 |

Demo: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/59b04/5

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thanks for the brilliant answer! How do I cater for the situation where phonenum might be non-numeric such as where it might be del_2712212 or an ip address? I just want to exclude this "dirty" data for now. –  Zahir J Nov 19 '12 at 15:58
1  
@Zahir: Just come up with a filter to leave that data out, and include it in a where clause on the inner query. You should be able to find numerous examples on the web how to validate that data is numeric. You may also need to cast it for the query to work properly, as I assumed the input data was already a numeric type. –  mellamokb Nov 19 '12 at 16:02

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