Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can I get some working code examples that I can pick apart and study how they work? Specifically, I need to figure out how do I get the address field from the x numbered object in my list? How do I delete the xth object from the list? How do I set the price field of object x to a new value?

I understand how the houseList.add places the data into a new object that is appended to the end of the list, but I do not understand the converse of it and how to target a specific object and manipulate it. Please show a working multi-class example. Thanks!

The class that creates the House object and it holds the following information;

public House(int address, String street, double price, int rooms) {
    this.address = address;
    this.street = street;
    this.price = price;
    this.rooms = rooms;
}

and it has the following methods...

public void SetAddress (int address){
    setAddress(address);
}

private void setAddress (int address){
    this.address = address;
}

public int GetAddress (int address){
    address = getAddress(address);
    return address;
}

private int getAddress (int address){
    return address;
}

@Override
public String toString() {
    return address + " " + street + " " + price + " " + rooms;
}

etc...

In another class, I declare a List of House objects named houseList and that it is an ArrayList.

List<House> houseList;
houseList = new ArrayList();

and can fill it with data,

houseList.add(new House(this.address, this.street, this.price, this.rooms));  

and iterate through it...

  public void showHouses() {
    Iterator<House> itr = houseList.iterator();
    while (itr.hasNext()) {
        System.out.println(itr.next().toString());
    }
}

up to this point, none of my House methods as listed above come into play, except for the toString method which has been overridden. What I have not been able to figure out is how to pull this.street or this.price for the xth element of the list. I can place data into the list with houseList.add(new House(this.address, this.street, this.price, this.rooms));
and I can see my data is stored as expected when iterated through. I have these setters and getters, but I am not understanding how they are to be used to pull these items out or set them in. Since I used houseList.add, I figured the opposite of add would be to get, but haven't figured out the correct syntax.

share|improve this question
    
Your getters are serioualy flawed. A getter is supposed to not take any argument, and return some value of the object (and not the value that you pass as argument). And having two getters doing exactly the same thing, with one not respecting the naming conventions is a really bad idea as well. –  JB Nizet Nov 19 '12 at 15:48
    
As for two methods doing the same, one is public and the other is private. As I understand, this is encapsulation and prevents direct access to the data and allows me to control via code what goes in or comes out and that this was a good practice to follow. Am I wrong in this? Please explain if so. –  Michael Nov 19 '12 at 16:14
1  
If you have a public method doing something, there is no point in having a private method doing the same thing. If the private method was one part of the implementation of a complex public method, I would understand, but a public getter calling a private getter doesn't make much sense. –  JB Nizet Nov 19 '12 at 16:24
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Fixing getters

First, deal with the getters/setters. The following getter:

private int getAddress (int address){
    return address;
}

should be fixed to look like this:

private int getAddress() {
    return address;
}

In your code, your getAddress(int address) method has an int parameter, and returns the argument directly. It doesn't even look at the field storing the address value.

Iterating over the list

You can rewrite this:

public void showHouses() {
    Iterator<House> itr = houseList.iterator();
    while (itr.hasNext()) {
        System.out.println(itr.next().toString());
    }
}

in a more compact way, using a Java-5 style for loop, like this:

public void showHouses() {
    for (House house : houseList) {
        System.out.println(house);
        // or, say: System.out.println(house.getAddress());
    }
}

or like this, if you really want to use an iterator:

public void showHouses() {
    Iterator<House> itr = houseList.iterator();
    while (itr.hasNext()) {
        House house = itr.next();
        System.out.println(house);
        // or, say: System.out.println(house.getAddress());
    }
}

Note that in the example above, you typically need to be careful to call next() only once per iteration. That is: assign itr.next() to a local variable, and use that, instead of calling itr.next() more than once per iteration.

The advantage of the first way is that it's shorter; and it's clear that all you're doing is iterating over the collection, and not modifying it in any way (although you can still modify its values).

The advantage of the second way is that you can call itr.remove() to remove elements from the collection as you traverse (iterate over) it.

The x'th house

If you need the x'th house, you can write:

int x = ...;
House h = houseList.get(x);
System.out.println(h);
// or: System.out.println(h.getAddress());

.

Edit:

Here's one more pattern you sometimes see in code that traverses a list:

for (Iterator<House> it = houseList.iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
    House house = it.next();
    // Blah, blah..
}

This has the same advantages as the iterator-based traversal above. However, this version limits the scope of the iterator variable (it) to the loop body. In the version above, the scope of the iterator variable is the whole method body. Hence, it's easier to see that you never use the iterator outside the loop.

Limiting the scope to the loop body is also useful when you want to perform more than one iterator-based traversal in a method (or other block). It also allows you to re-use the same variable name for the second loop (even if the second loop iterates over a collection of a different type).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this really helps me see how it works. Now I can understand why it works. I am using the List to hold the House objects and I can iterate through the House objects. Once I have the House object, I can access the fields it contains and can manipulate it by calling its methods. It comes down to learning the syntax and what it can do for you. –  Michael Nov 19 '12 at 18:28
add comment

itr.next() returns next available House object from list. You need to call methods on that house object.

Example:

 while (itr.hasNext()) {

        House hs = itr.next();
        System.out.println(hs.getAddress(input));
        System.out.println(hs.toString());
    }
share|improve this answer
    
How would I target #3 on the list. I barely understand how the iterator is moving through my list and just knows it moves from 0 to the end as long as there is data in the element. Could you please use my variable names... Is hs == houseList? I do not understand how House hs = itr.next(); would represent in my code. Do I have to redeclare a House or something? Am I just saying that hs is a House object. I think I get it now... Does this mean I have to iterate through the entire list each time I need to access a specific House? –  Michael Nov 19 '12 at 15:49
    
@Michael: hs is HouseObject reference, What ever object you have added using houseList.add(....), that would be again assigned to hs while iterating. –  Nambari Nov 19 '12 at 15:52
    
@Michael: See this example: java-samples.com/showtutorial.php?tutorialid=235 –  Nambari Nov 19 '12 at 15:53
    
While I appreciate your code example that does indeed shed some light on my question, I have seen this example and many like it, but none of them address my needs or extends my understanding of manipulating lists and, specifically, the objects in those lists. I am able to iterate through the list as is. The example shown has everything in a single class and with a one-dimensional array of primitives. –  Michael Nov 19 '12 at 17:18
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.