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I have an algorithm that is rather difficult to understand, so I have written it down in the form of single assignments to const variables, with lots of commentary in between explaining why I'm doing that. Whenever the algorithm rejects a solution, a return statement leads out.

The customer, on the other hand, requested that the method have no "early" return statements, which is a somewhat conflicting goal, as the only way I could use my const variables in this scenario is lots of nested if blocks.

Is there an elegant solution that would allow me to get the best of both worlds -- variables that are valid if they are in scope and still a somewhat flat hierarchy?

EDIT: The customer also frowns upon exceptions and goto. This is a hot path, implementing a decision tree that determines whether a proposed solution from a solution generator is both acceptable and better than the previous solution.

The scoping with nested ifs would look like

if(fulfills_condition_1(sol)) {
    double const some_quality = quality_function_1(sol);
    double const normalized_quality = normalize_quality_1(some_quality);
    if(fulfills_condition_2(normalized_quality) {
    {
        double const another_quality = ...
    }
}

My current approach looks like

if(!fulfills_condition_1(sol))
    return;
double const some_quality = quality_function_1(sol);
double const normalized_quality = normalize_quality_1(some_quality);
if(!fulfills_condition_2(normalized_quality) {
    return;

...

update_current_solution(sol);
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5  
These "no early return" types are annoying. If your method makes its arguments and return values clear, the details of the implementation should not be a concern. This knee-jerk approach to rejecting a valid method of implementing is often from paranoia. You use unit tests should exercise all branches and verify that they work correctly. –  tadman Nov 19 '12 at 16:25
    
Wrap all your code inside a try catch, throw on failure, catch and return. Problem fixed. –  pmr Nov 19 '12 at 16:26
    
Maybe the first part of your algorithm can assign a variable that captures a lambda, and the return line can call whatever lambda has been assigned? I doubt you're allowed C++11, though. –  tadman Nov 19 '12 at 16:28
    
How many conditions are there? –  Jørgen Fogh Nov 19 '12 at 16:40
1  
Do all 12 conditions refer back to the qualities computed for the earlier conditions, or is it just some of them? I would want to abstract the computation of each set of qualities and the use of them to test the corresponding condition into some kind of unit, and then loop over the 12 units with a continuation expression to say that the condition is fulfilled. But if the specification is a gigantic spaghetti of inter-relations between the different qualities then the code can't be all that much better. –  Steve Jessop Nov 19 '12 at 18:06
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4 Answers 4

The customer, on the other hand, requested that the method have no "early" return statements

This requirement doesn't make code any better in C++ world, provided destructors are used for clean up, as they normally should in C++.

It is only useful for C code to avoid clean up duplication all over the function with multiple returns. And this is exactly the style used for Linux kernel.

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Not that double requires any cleanup in C either. "What if we need cleanup?" "Then multiple returns would be a nightmare, don't use them" "So what if we don't need cleanup?" "Don't use multiple returns, because if you did need cleanup it would be a nightmare" –  Steve Jessop Nov 19 '12 at 18:12
    
@SteveJessop "Don't use multiple returns, because if you did need cleanup it would be a nightmare" - this, again, doesn't quite apply to C++ because destructors are superior to manual clean up routines and try/catch/cleanup/rethrow (anti)pattern. "What if that function now throws?" "Don't use manual clean up then, use destructors". –  Maxim Yegorushkin Nov 19 '12 at 19:42
1  
agreed, my discussion was intended to apply to the case where this function is written in C. Where, as you say, cleanup code would be a compelling reason for a single point of exit. –  Steve Jessop Nov 19 '12 at 19:55
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One way is to refactor the algorithm into several functions so that the code that should be missed oy by a return is put into a new function and the test is reversed. (However without exceptions I suspect this is less elegant than your original code)

So original

T algorithm_fn() {
  T result;
  ...
  if (x) {
    return result;
  }
  //do more
}

becomes

T new_func( // the const parameters ) {
    //do more
}

T algorithm_fn() {
  T result;
  ...
  if (!x) {
     result = new_func( // the const parameters );
  }
  return result;
}
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One way to avoid exceptions is to return a bool result from these sub-functions to tell the caller whether or not the algorithm should continue. In my view it's less explicit, but sometimes you have to work around the customer's prejudice. –  David Harkness Nov 21 '12 at 10:20
    
@DavidHarkness - true but makes the code less elegant –  Mark Nov 21 '12 at 10:22
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Not sure if this will fall into the "circumventing customer requirements" category, but you can use a do/while loop to break out of a code block that you only want to run once.

int foo()
{
    int value = 0;
    do
    {           
       if ( condition1 ) { ... }
       else { break; }
       if ( condition2 ) { ... }
       else { break; }
    } while ( false )  // the do/while loop is only run through once.

    // do whatever clean up etc is needed.

    return value;      
 }
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I'd say this is one of the only structures where goto's are acceptable. Instead of returning, assign a return value to a variable, than goto the end of the method with the return statement.

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Problem is you can't assign to a const. –  tadman Nov 19 '12 at 16:26
    
Do you seriously think this is a good idea, or just a way to circumvent the customer's requirements? –  Jørgen Fogh Nov 19 '12 at 16:26
    
Alas, the coding guidelines also prohibit goto, as that could be used to skip variable initializations. :/ –  Simon Richter Nov 19 '12 at 16:26
    
@JørgenFogh I seriously think this is a good idea and have used it in quite a few production projects. –  Minion91 Nov 19 '12 at 16:30
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