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For my application, I had to write a custom "readline" method since I wanted to detect and preserve the newline endings in an ASCII text file. The Java readLine() method does not tell which newline sequence (\r, \n, \r\n) or EOF was encountered, so I cannot put the exact same newline sequence when writing to the modified file.

Here is the SSCE of my test example.

public class TestLineIO {
    public static java.util.ArrayList<String> readLineArrayFromFile1(java.io.File file) {
        java.util.ArrayList<String> lineArray = new java.util.ArrayList<String>();
        try {
            java.io.BufferedReader br = new java.io.BufferedReader(new java.io.FileReader(file));
            String strLine;
            while ((strLine = br.readLine()) != null) {
                lineArray.add(strLine);
            }
            br.close();
        } catch (java.io.IOException e) {
            System.err.println("Could not read file");
            System.err.println(e);
        }
        lineArray.trimToSize();
        return lineArray;
    }


    public static boolean writeLineArrayToFile1(java.util.ArrayList<String> lineArray, java.io.File file) {
        try {
            java.io.BufferedWriter out = new java.io.BufferedWriter(new java.io.FileWriter(file));
            int size = lineArray.size();
            for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
                out.write(lineArray.get(i));
                out.newLine();
            }
            out.close();
        } catch (java.io.IOException e) {
            System.err.println("Could not write file");
            System.err.println(e);
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }


    public static java.util.ArrayList<String> readLineArrayFromFile2(java.io.File file) {
        java.util.ArrayList<String> lineArray = new java.util.ArrayList<String>();
        try {
            java.io.FileInputStream stream = new java.io.FileInputStream(file);
            try {
                java.nio.channels.FileChannel fc = stream.getChannel();
                java.nio.MappedByteBuffer bb = fc.map(java.nio.channels.FileChannel.MapMode.READ_ONLY, 0, fc.size());
                char[] fileArray = java.nio.charset.Charset.defaultCharset().decode(bb).array();
                if (fileArray == null || fileArray.length == 0) {
                    return lineArray;
                }
                int length = fileArray.length;
                int start = 0;
                int index = 0;
                while (index < length) {
                    if (fileArray[index] == '\n') {
                        lineArray.add(new String(fileArray, start, index - start + 1));
                        start = index + 1;
                    } else if (fileArray[index] == '\r') {
                        if (index == length - 1) { //last character in the file
                            lineArray.add(new String(fileArray, start, length - start));
                            start = length;
                            break;
                        } else {
                            if (fileArray[index + 1] == '\n') {
                                lineArray.add(new String(fileArray, start, index - start + 2));
                                start = index + 2;
                                index++;
                            } else {
                                lineArray.add(new String(fileArray, start, index - start + 1));
                                start = index + 1;
                            }
                        }
                    }
                    index++;
                }
                if (start < length) {
                    lineArray.add(new String(fileArray, start, length - start));
                }
            } finally {
                stream.close();
            }
        } catch (java.io.IOException e) {
            System.err.println("Could not read file");
            System.err.println(e);
            e.printStackTrace();
            return lineArray;
        }
        lineArray.trimToSize();
        return lineArray;
    }


    public static boolean writeLineArrayToFile2(java.util.ArrayList<String> lineArray, java.io.File file) {
        try {
            java.io.BufferedWriter out = new java.io.BufferedWriter(new java.io.FileWriter(file));
            int size = lineArray.size();
            for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
                out.write(lineArray.get(i));
            }
            out.close();
        } catch (java.io.IOException e) {
            System.err.println("Could not write file");
            System.err.println(e);
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Begin");
        String fileName = "test.txt";
        long start = 0;
        long stop = 0;

        start = java.util.Calendar.getInstance().getTimeInMillis();
        java.io.File f = new java.io.File(fileName);
        java.util.ArrayList<String> javaLineArray = readLineArrayFromFile1(f);
        stop = java.util.Calendar.getInstance().getTimeInMillis();
        System.out.println("Total time = " + (stop - start) + " ms");       
        java.io.File oj = new java.io.File(fileName + "_readline.txt");
        writeLineArrayToFile1(javaLineArray, oj);

        start = java.util.Calendar.getInstance().getTimeInMillis();
        java.util.ArrayList<String> myLineArray = readLineArrayFromFile2(f);
        stop = java.util.Calendar.getInstance().getTimeInMillis();
        System.out.println("Total time = " + (stop - start) + " ms");       
        java.io.File om = new java.io.File(fileName + "_custom.txt");
        writeLineArrayToFile2(myLineArray, om);

        System.out.println("End");
    }
}

Version 1 uses readLine(), whereas version 2 is my version, which preserves newline characters.

On a text file with about 500K lines, version1 takes about 380 ms, whereas version2 takes 1074 ms.

How can I speed-up the performance of version2?

I checked Google guava and apache-commons libraries but cannot find a suitable replacement for "readLine()" that will tell which newline character was encountered when reading a text file.

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3  
The first step of any "how can I speed up X" question is to break out a profiler and see where the CPU is spending the majority of its time. Often simply seeing a surprising result can alert you to your code not executing exactly as you'd expect and highlight a simple fix. –  Andrzej Doyle Nov 19 '12 at 16:42
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Whenever the issue regards a program's speed, the main thing you should keep in mind is that, for any continuous process within that program, the speed is nearly always limited by one of two things: CPU (processing power) or IO (memory allocation and transfer speed).

Usually either your CPU is faster than your IO, or the contrary. Because of this, your program's speed-limit is almost always dictated by one of them, and it's usually easy to know which:

  • A program that does a lot of calculations but makes only a few, small operations with files, is almost certainly CPU-bound.
  • A program that reads a lot of data from files, or writes a lot of data to them, but is not very demanding towards processing, is almost certainly IO-bound.

Things are kinda straightforward when trying to improve an CPU-bounded program's speed. It mostly comes down to achieving the same goal or effect while making less operations.

This, on the other hand, does not make the process any easier. In fact, it's usually much harder to optimize CPU-bounded programs than to optimize IO-bounded ones, because each CPU-related operation is usually unique, and has to be revised individually.


Although generally easier once you have the experience, things are not so straightforward with IO-bound programs. There are a lot more stuff to consider when dealing with IO-bound processes.

I'll be using Hard-Disk Drives (HDDs) as the basis, since the characteristics I'll mention affect HDDs the strongest (because they are mechanical), but you should keep in mind that many of the same concepts apply, to some extent, to almost every memory-storage hardware, including Solid-State Drives (SSDs) and even RAM!

These are the main performance characteristics of most memory-storage hardware:

  • Access time: Also known as response time, it is the time it takes before the hardware can actually transfer data.

    • For mechanical hardware such as HDDs, this is mostly related to the mechanical nature of the drive, in other words, it's rotating disk and moving "heads". As such, access time of mechanical drives can vary significantly between each-other.
    • For circuital hardware such as SSDs and RAM, this time is not dependent on moving parts, but rather electrical connections, so the access time is very quick and consistent, and you shouldn't worry about it.
  • Seek time: The time it takes for the hardware to seek (reach) the correct position within it's internal subdivisions, in order to read from or write to addresses in that section.

    • For mechanical drives, mainly rotary ones, the seek time measures the time it takes the head assembly on the actuator arm to travel to the track of the disk where the data will be read from or written to.
      Average seek time ranges from 3 ms (~) for high-end server drives, to 15 ms (~) for mobile drives, with the most common desktop drives typically having a seek time around 9 ms (~).
    • With RAM and SSDs, there are no moving parts, so a measurement of the seek time is only testing the electronic circuits, and preparing a particular location on the memory in the device for the operation.
      Typical SSDs will have a seek time between 0.08 to 0.16 ms (~), with RAM being even faster.
  • Command-Processing time: Also known as command overhead, it is the time it takes for the drive's electronics to set up the necessary communication between the various internal components, so it can read or write the data.
    This is in the range of 0.003 ms (~) for both, mechanical and circuital devices, and is usually ignored in benchmarks.

  • Settle time: It is the time it takes for the heads to settle on the target track and stop vibrating, so that they do not read or write off-track.
    This amount is usually very small (typically less than 0.1 ms), and typically included in benchmarks as part of the seek time.

  • Data-Transfer rate: Also called throughput, it covers both: The internal rate, which is the time it takes to move data between the disk surface and the controller on the drive. And the external rate, which is the time to move data between the controller on the drive and an external component in the host system. It has a few sub-factors within:

    • Media rate: Speed at which the drive can read bits from the media. In other words, the actual read/write speed.
    • Sector overhead: Additional time (bytes) needed for control structures and other information necessary to manage the drive, locate and validate data and perform other support functions.
    • Allocation speed: Similar to sector overhead, it's the time taken for the drive to determine the slots that will be written to, and to register them on it's address dictionary. Only needed for write operations.
    • Head-Switch time: Time required to electrically switch from one head to another; Only applies to multi-head drives and is about 1 to 2 ms.
    • Cylinder-switch time: Time required to move to an adjacent track; The name cylinder is used because typically all the tracks of a drive with more than one head or data surface are read before moving the actuator, implying the image of a circle or cylinder rather than a track. This time is exclusive to rotary mechanical drives, and is typically about about 2 to 3 ms.

This means that the main performance issues regarding IO are caused by going back-and-forth between IO and processing. An issue that can be enormously diminished by using buffers, and processing and reading/writhing in bigger chunks of data, rather than every byte.

As you can also see, although many of the speed characteristics are still present, RAM and SSDs do not have the same internal limits of HDDs, so their internal and external transfer rates often reach the maximum capabilities of the drive-to-host interface.


Chunk approach example:

This example will create a Test folder on the desktop, and generate a Test.txt file within.

The file is generated with an specified number of lines, each line containing the word "Test" repeated for an specific number of times (for file-size purposes). Each line is ended by "\r", "\n" or "\r\n", sequentially.


It's meaningless to save the results of each chunk in-memory cumulatively, as doing so would lead the whole file end up in-memory eventually, which is nearly the same problem of not using chunks to begin with.

As such, an output file is created in the same Test folder, to which the result of every chunk is stored at, once that chunk is finished.

The base file is read using buffers, and those buffers are additionally used as the chunks.

The process here is simply printing a textual version of the line-separator ("\\r", "\\n" or "\\r\\n"), followed by ": ", followed by the line contents; But for the last line, "EOF" is used instead.

To actually operate with chunks, it's probably easier to manage with a class-based approach, rather than a purely function-based one.

Anyways, here goes the code:

public static void main(String[] args) throws FileNotFoundException, IOException {
    File file = new File(TEST_FOLDER, "Test.txt");
    //These settings create a 122 MB file.
    generateTestFile(file, 500000, 50);

    long clock = System.nanoTime();
    processChunks(file, 8 * (int) Math.pow(1024, 2));
    clock = System.nanoTime() - clock;
    float millis = clock / 1000000f;
    float seconds = millis / 1000f;
    System.out.printf(""
                    + "%12d nanos\n"
                    + "%12.3f millis\n"
                    + "%12.3f seconds\n",
                    clock, millis, seconds);
}

public static File prepareResultFile(File source) {
    String ofn = source.getName(); //Original File Name.
    int extPos = ofn.lastIndexOf('.'); //Extension index.
    String ext = ofn.substring(extPos); //Get extension.
    ofn = ofn.substring(0, extPos); //Get name without extension reusing 'ofn'.
    return new File(source.getParentFile(), ofn + "_Result" + ext);
}

public static void processChunks(File file, int buffSize)
                throws FileNotFoundException, IOException {
    //No need for buffers bigger than the file itself.
    if (file.length() < buffSize) {
        buffSize = (int)file.length();
    }
    byte[] buffer = new byte[buffSize];
    BufferedInputStream bis = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(file), buffSize);

    BufferedOutputStream bos = new BufferedOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(
                    prepareResultFile(file)), buffSize);

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    while (bis.read(buffer) > (-1)) {
        //Check if a "\r\n" was split between chunks.
        boolean skipFirst = false;
        if (sb.length() > 0 && sb.charAt(sb.length() - 1) == '\r') {
            if (buffer[0] == '\n') {
                bos.write(("\\r\\n: " + sb.toString() + System.lineSeparator()).getBytes());
                sb = new StringBuilder();
                skipFirst = true;
            }
        }

        for (int i = skipFirst ? 1 : 0; i < buffer.length; i++) {
            if (buffer[i] == '\r') {
                if (i + 1 < buffer.length) {
                    if (buffer[i + 1] == '\n') {
                        bos.write(("\\r\\n: " + sb.toString() + System.lineSeparator()).getBytes());
                        i++; //Skip '\n'.
                    } else {
                        bos.write(("\\r: " + sb.toString() + System.lineSeparator()).getBytes());
                    }
                    sb = new StringBuilder(); //Reset accumulator.
                } else {
                    //A "\r\n" might be split between two chunks.
                }
            } else if (buffer[i] == '\n') {
                bos.write(("\\n: " + sb.toString() + System.lineSeparator()).getBytes());
                sb = new StringBuilder(); //Reset accumulator.
            } else {
                sb.append((char) buffer[i]);
            }
        }
    }
    bos.write(("EOF: " + sb.toString()).getBytes());
    bos.flush();
    bos.close();
    bis.close();
    System.out.println("Finished!");
}

public static boolean generateTestFile(File file, int lines, int elements)
                throws IOException {
    String[] lineBreakers = {"\r", "\n", "\r\n"};
    BufferedOutputStream bos = null;
    try {
        bos = new BufferedOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(file));
        for (int i = 0; i < lines; i++) {
            for (int ii = 1; ii < elements; ii++) {
                bos.write("test ".getBytes());
            }
            bos.write("test".getBytes());
            bos.write(lineBreakers[i % 3].getBytes());
        }
        bos.flush();
        System.out.printf("LOG: Test file \"%s\" created.\n", file.getName());
        return true;
    } catch (IOException ex) {
        System.err.println("ERR: Could not write file.");
        throw ex;
    } finally {
        try {
            bos.close();
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            System.err.println("WRN: Could not close stream.");
            Logger.getLogger(Q_13458142_v2.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
        }
    }
}

I don't know what IDE you are using, but if it's NetBeans, make a memory-profile of your code and compare to a profile of this one. You should notice a big difference in the amount of memory needed during processing.

Here, the chunk approach's memory usage, which includes not only the chunk itself but also the program's own variables and structures, does not go over 40 MB even tough we are dealing with a file bigger than 100 MB. As you can see: enter image description here

It also spends very little time in GB, mostly less than 5% at any given point: enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your lengthy and useful explanation. Although not explicitly, I am using some kind of buffer when using FileChannel.map to read the entire file at once. –  Santosh Tiwari Nov 26 '12 at 21:58
1  
@SantoshTiwari - That's where Java specifics come to play. Considering your files are ranging 10-100 MB, it's likely you are overrunning your HEAP with data and forcing Java to do full garbage collections rather than a slower-paced but continuous cleaning. Each of those "FGCs" making the program go idle for a few moments; Most likely 0.2 seconds or more for each, which is a non-trivial loss of time. --- This is subjective, but I think one (you) should consider processing in chunks whenever dealing with files bigger than 32 MB (~). --- I'll include a chunk example to the answer. –  TheLima Nov 27 '12 at 14:56
    
Thanks for the code. It works - after some minor changes. :) I will modify it slightly - and benchmark it. –  Santosh Tiwari Nov 28 '12 at 15:10
    
Your method is faster. Java's readline takes 830 ms. My method takes 2074 ms and your method takes 1295 ms. I am going to adapt (and thoroughly test) your method. –  Santosh Tiwari Nov 28 '12 at 15:25
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The second version doesn't seem to use BufferedReader or another form of buffer. It might be the cause of slow down.

Since you seem to read the whole file in memory, you can perhaps read it as a big string (with a buffer) then parse it in memory to analyze the line endings.

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1  
Regarding the second part - Unless the file is very large (in which case it should be read processed in smaller chunks), I believe that would be the most appropriate approach. It's both, efficient and simple to implement. - A simple use of Pattern and Matcher solves the "newline-type" issue. --- Thus, this has my [+1]! –  TheLima Nov 19 '12 at 16:55
    
You both are correct in stating that for a very large file, it is not advisable to read the entire file into memory. Unfortunately, that is a design limitation of my software (the entire file has to be provided to it as an array of lines). –  Santosh Tiwari Nov 19 '12 at 16:58
    
@PhiLho: I am reading the entire file as a single big character array and then parsing it to generate lines. –  Santosh Tiwari Nov 19 '12 at 16:58
    
@SantoshTiwari - Just out of interest, how big is(are) your file(s), memory-wise? (/How many MB?) –  TheLima Nov 19 '12 at 17:34
1  
@SantoshTiwari - Excellent article! Tough it approaches from a slightly different topic (OS and method-calls rather than hardware), the reasons are the same (many small calls instead of a few bigger ones). --- As for performance, that same article shows there isn't much difference between using "FileChannel with a wrapped array ByteBuffer" and using "BufferedInputStream with an internal 8 Kbyte buffer" is very small, while the second is thread-safe and simpler to implement. Thus, unless you are dealing with large amounts (Terabytes) of large files (>=256 MB ~), it's the 2nd approach. –  TheLima Nov 28 '12 at 14:51
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Your are doubling the out statements(one for line and one for newline):

Can you try below(use lineSeparator() to get the line separator and append before writing):

        out.write(lineArray.get(i)+System.lineSeparator());
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestion. I will modify the code to reduce the number of calls for the write operation. I am however worried about the time to read and generate the list of lines. –  Santosh Tiwari Nov 19 '12 at 16:59
    
It does not matter much, but I still chose your modification. The trade-off is replacing an "out.write()" function call with String addition. In my test it did not affect much. I created a public static final field to store the line separator so that I do not call "System.getProperty("line.separator")" multiple times. –  Santosh Tiwari Nov 26 '12 at 22:00
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Don't reinvent the wheel.
Check the BufferedReader#readLine() code
Copy, paste, and make the changes you need to keep the line separator inside the line

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