Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I tell the time difference in minutes between two datetime objects?

share|improve this question
60  
>When you read docs.python.org/library/… what did you see? – S.Lott I saw a wall of documentation from which I did not manage to extract the correct answer to my question. –  Hobhouse Aug 29 '09 at 15:48

7 Answers 7

up vote 69 down vote accepted
>>> import datetime
>>> a = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> b = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> c = b - a
datetime.timedelta(0, 8, 562000)
>>> divmod(c.days * 86400 + c.seconds, 60)
(0, 8)      # 0 minutes, 8 seconds
share|improve this answer
2  
Reference: docs.python.org/library/datetime.html#datetime-objects. Read "supported operations". –  S.Lott Aug 28 '09 at 10:08
1  
delorean.readthedocs.org/en/latest is cool for that too –  markcial Feb 16 '14 at 22:09
    
@SilentGhost, How to get with hours,minuits,seconds –  Mulagala Jun 14 '14 at 7:01
    
@markcial: delorean misrepresents datetime, pytz approach e.g., the getting started code example could be written as d = datetime.now(timezone(EST)) (one readable line instead of five). –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 10 at 8:57
    
note: you should be careful when performing date/time arithmetics on naive datetime objects that represent local time. It may fail e.g., around DST transitions. See the link with more details in my answer –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 10 at 8:59

New at Python 2.7 is the timedelta instance method .total_seconds(). From the Python docs, this is equivalent to (td.microseconds + (td.seconds + td.days * 24 * 3600) * 10**6) / 10**6.

Reference: http://docs.python.org/2/library/datetime.html#datetime.timedelta.total_seconds

>>> import datetime
>>> time1 = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> time2 = datetime.datetime.now() # waited a few minutes before pressing enter
>>> elapsedTime = time2 - time1
>>> elapsedTime
datetime.timedelta(0, 125, 749430)
>>> divmod(elapsedTime.total_seconds(), 60)
(2.0, 5.749430000000004) # divmod returns quotient and remainder
# 2 minutes, 5.74943 seconds
share|improve this answer
6  
+1 for comments, especially explaining WTH that divmod thing is. –  ForeverWintr Mar 31 '13 at 3:58
    

Just subtract one from the other. You get a timedelta object with the difference.

>>> import datetime
>>> d1 = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> d2 = datetime.datetime.now() # after a 5-second or so pause
>>> d2 - d1
datetime.timedelta(0, 5, 203000)

You can convert dd.days, dd.seconds and dd.microseconds to minutes.

share|improve this answer

This is how I get the number of hours that elapsed between two datetime.datetime objects:

before = datetime.datetime.now()
after  = datetime.datetime.now()
hours  = math.floor(((after - before).seconds) / 3600)
share|improve this answer
3  
This won't quite work: timedelta.seconds only gives the number of seconds explicitly stored - which the documentation guarantees will total less than one day. You want (after - before).total_seconds(), which gives the number of seconds that span the entire delta. –  lvc May 26 '13 at 1:25
1  
(after - before).total_seconds() // 3600 (Python 2.7) or (after - before) // timedelta(seconds=3600) (Python 3) –  J.F. Sebastian May 26 '13 at 2:09
    
@lvc My old code was actually written that way, and I thought I was being smart and "fixing" it up. Thanks for the correction. –  Tony May 26 '13 at 23:08
    
@J.F.Sebastian Thanks for that, I forgot about the // operator. And I do I like the py3 syntax better, but am using 2.7. –  Tony May 26 '13 at 23:10
    
@Tony: // works on Python 2 and 3. –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 27 '14 at 11:42

Use divmod:

now = int(time.time()) # epoch seconds
then = now - 90000 # some time in the past

d = divmod(now-then,86400)  # days
h = divmod(d[1],3600)  # hours
m = divmod(h[1],60)  # minutes
s = m[1]  # seconds

print '%d days, %d hours, %d minutes, %d seconds' % (d[0],h[0],m[0],s)
share|improve this answer
1  
why was this voted down? –  tgwaste Jun 12 '14 at 1:20
    
This should be put into datetime module. I just can't understand why it used only days, seconds and millis... –  paulochf Dec 5 '14 at 17:59

If a, b are datetime objects then to find the time difference between them in Python 3:

from datetime import timedelta

time_difference = a - b
time_difference_in_minutes = time_difference / timedelta(minutes=1)

On earlier Python versions:

time_difference_in_minutes = time_difference.total_seconds() / 60

If a, b are naive datetime objects such as returned by datetime.now() then the result may be wrong if the objects represent local time with different UTC offsets e.g., around DST transitions or for past/future dates. More details: Find if 24 hrs have passed between datetimes - Python.

To get reliable results, use UTC time or timezone-aware datetime objects.

share|improve this answer

This is my approach using mktime.

from datetime import datetime, timedelta
from mktime import mktime

yesterday = datetime.now() - timedelta(days=1)
today = datetime.now()

difference_in_seconds = abs(mktime(yesterday.timetuple()) - mktime(today.timetuple()))
difference_in_minutes = difference_in_seconds / 60
share|improve this answer
    
mktime() expects local time as an input. Local time maybe ambiguous and mktime() may return a wrong answer in this case. Use a - b instead (a,b - datetime objects). mktime() is unnecessary and it is sometimes wrong. Don't use it in this case. –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 27 '14 at 11:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.