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Suppose we have a class Test like:

public class Test {
    private final String name;
    private final List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();

    public Test(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    void add(String s) {
        list.add(s);
    }

    void print() {
        System.out.println("name: " + name);
        for (String s : list) {
            System.out.println(" - " + s);
        }
    }
}

Without XSteam the invariant

this.list != null

holds every time.

But if we look in the 4th test in

public static void main(String[] args) {
    final XStream xstream = new XStream();
    xstream.alias("test", Test.class);

    // Serialize
    final Test test1 = new Test("XYZ");
    test1.add("One");
    test1.add("Two");

    //@formatter:off
    /* name: XYZ
     *  - One
     *  - Two
     */
    //@formatter:on
    test1.print();

    //@formatter:off
    /* <test>
     *   <name>XYZ</name>
     *   <list>
     *     <string>One</string>
     *     <string>Two</string>
     *   </list>
     * </test>
     */
    //@formatter:on
    System.out.println(xstream.toXML(test1));

    // Deserialize with one list entry
    final String xmlTest2 = "<test><name>XYZ</name><list><string>One</string></list></test>";
    final Test test2 = (Test) xstream.fromXML(xmlTest2);
    //@formatter:off
    /* <test>
     *   <name>XYZ</name>
     *   <list>
     *     <string>One</string>
     *   </list>
     * </test>
     */
    //@formatter:on
    test2.print();

    // Deserialize with empty list
    final String xmlTest3 = "<test><name>XYZ</name><list /></test>";
    final Test test3 = (Test) xstream.fromXML(xmlTest3);
    //@formatter:off
    /* name: XYZ
     */
    //@formatter:on
    test3.print();

    // Deserialize without list-tag
    final String xmlTest4 = "<test><name>XYZ</name></test>";
    final Test test4 = (Test) xstream.fromXML(xmlTest4);
    //@formatter:off
    /* name: XYZ
     * Exception in thead ... NullPointerException
     */
    //@formatter:on
    test4.print();
}

we see a NullPointerException, because list was not initialized.

I'd like to have the list-element in the XML optional similiar to test4. What can I do? Because there are many classes in my datamodel similiar to Test, I don't want to write a Converter for every class. But suppose I would write a Converter, how can I set the final attribute name?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

XStream uses munged constructors (http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1426106/why-are-constructors-returned-by-reflectionfactor-newconstructorforserialization) in enhanced mode (default). You can change this behavior by initializing XStream in pure mode:

XStream xstream = new XStream(new PureJavaReflectionProvider());

Another option is to access variables using getters and implement lazy initialization.

public class Test {
private final String name;
private List<String> list;

public Test(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}

void add(String s) {
    list.add(s);
}

List<String> getList() {
  if (list == null) {
    list = new ArrayList<>();
  }
  return list;
}

void print() {
    System.out.println("name: " + name);
    for (String s : getList()) {
        System.out.println(" - " + s);
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Your first suggestion work's well. I use the PureJavaReflectionProvider. Additional I must write a private constructor, that initializes fields with null that are not initialized by the declaration, in this case name. Although name is initialized with null, XStream is able to set it to "XYZ". Becouse of the constructor is private, this is an elegant way to let the fields final. –  Vertex Nov 19 '12 at 19:43

Please find the following solution using XStream Annotations and a custom Converter.

The custom converter is the following class:

 public class ListableConverter implements Converter {

    public void marshal(Object source, HierarchicalStreamWriter writer,
            MarshallingContext context) {
        Listable listable = (Listable) source;
        writer.setValue(String.valueOf(... your marshalling logic here ...));
    }

    public Object unmarshal(HierarchicalStreamReader reader,
            UnmarshallingContext context) {
        List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
        // your unmarshalling logic here
        return list;
    }

    public boolean canConvert(Class type) {
        return type instanceof Listable;
    }
}

This is the modified Test class with Annotations:

public class Test implements Listable{
    private final String name;

    @XStreamConverter(ListableConverter.class)
    private final List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();

    public List<String> getList() {
        return list;
    }

    public Test(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    void add(String s) {
        list.add(s);
    }

    void print() {
        System.out.println("name: " + name);
        for (String s : list) {
            System.out.println(" - " + s);
        }
    }
}

And finally the interface used to make the converter good for any class in your model implementing the interface:

public interface Listable<String> {

    public List<String> getList();

}

So, for example, another class in your model may looks like:

    public class Foo implements Listable{

        @XStreamConverter(ListableConverter.class)
        private final List<String> anotherList = new ArrayList<>();

        ... omissis ...

        public List<String> getList() {
          return anotherList;
        }

   }
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I get confused when I try this solution. You've annotated the field list with @XStreamConverter(ListableConverter.class). ListableConverter can't convert ArrayList but only Listables. Either I have to write 1) the Converter for the hole class or 2) for Lists. With 1) I have to write for each class an own Converter; with 2), unmarshal would never called, becouse there is no <list>-element in the XML. –  Vertex Nov 19 '12 at 20:41

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