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I am new to Fabric and I am trying to cd into a directory I don't have permission to, so I'm using sudo. (The permissions on the directory are drwx------, i.e., 700)

I am using Fabric 0.9.7.

I tried this:

from fabric.api import run, env
from fabric.context_managers import cd

env.hosts = [ '1.2.3.4' ]
env.user = 'username'

def test():
       run('sudo cd /my/dir')
              run('ls')

But this gives me "sorry, you must have a tty to run sudo" which is understandable. I've also tried this:

snip:

def test():
        with cd('/my/dir'):
                run('ls')

But this returns "permission denied", again understandable.

In a nutshell, how do I "sudo cd" within Fabric?

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You should really start accepting answers if people solve your problems. Your 0% accept rate is likely to have an effect on if people are willing to help you. –  Brendan Long Nov 19 '12 at 17:53

2 Answers 2

This is because cd is a shell builtin command and not an actual program that can be run with sudo. You were on the right track with with cd(...):. Try something like:

with cd('/my/dir'):
    sudo('ls')

I think that will work, though admittedly I have not yet tried it myself. That's because the way the cd context manager works is to prepend cd <dirname> && to any command run with run() or sudo().

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Is there any reason you're not just using sudo()? It may work around the issue you're having.

If you're using a version of Fabric before 1.0, you'll need to explicitly tell it to create a TTY:

sudo("ls", pty=True)

Otherwise, you may need to edit your sudoers file and remove or comment out this line:

Defaults    requiretty 

Should be:

#Defaults    requiretty

Also, it may be more annoying, but if with cd(...) causes problems, you can always pass the path as an argument to ls:

sudo("ls /my/dir")
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I get "NameError: global name 'sudo' is not defined" when I did def test(): sudo("ls", pty=True) - maybe the syntax is wrong. –  ibash Nov 19 '12 at 17:23
    
@user1283693 You need to import it like you did with run: from fabric.api import run, env, sudo –  Brendan Long Nov 19 '12 at 17:28
    
If the "syntax" were wrong you would get a SyntaxError from Python :) –  Iguananaut Nov 19 '12 at 17:30
    
Yes that works! pty=True and import sudo solved my problem. Thanks. –  ibash Nov 20 '12 at 9:35
    
@ibash When someone solved your problem, you can mark their answer as accepted by clicking the check mark next to it. You can also vote up as many answers as you want (on any question) by clicking the arrows. Both of those things reward people who help you. I linked to a FAQ question about it in a comment on your question. –  Brendan Long Nov 20 '12 at 15:22

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