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I'm having the following issue. I have a stored procedure that I use to either update or insert data into the DB called say UpdateData. It looks roughly something like this (though simplified):

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[UpdateData] 
   @dataId as int,
   @data as int,
AS
BEGIN 
SET NOCOUNT ON;
declare @count int
select @count = (select COUNT(*) from DataTable data where data.id = @dataId)
if @count = 1
begin
update DataTable set data = @data from DataTable where  data.id = @dataId
select 'Updated' [operation] ,  @@ROWCOUNT [count]
end
else
begin
insert into DataTable (id, data)  values(@dataId, @data)
select 'Inserted' [operation] , @@ROWCOUNT [count]
end
END

I call this stored procedure from perl using DBI through a prepared statement iterating over my data. I then use a call to fetchrow_array to get the information about which operation was performed:

my $dbh = getDBHandle($debug);
foreach (@Data) {
     $updateData->execute($->[0], $_->[1]);
     my @row = $updateData->fetchrow_array;
     my ($action, $count) = ($row[0], $row[1]);
     print $row[0] .",$action, $count\n";
 }

What happens is that once any update statement is run then subsequently all action inserted descriptions are truncated form 'inserted' to 'inserte '. I think this is happening because the string 'updated' has one less character then 'inserted' and once fetchrow_array is called with that string in the column it resets some kind of limit. If I make the difference between the two description strings more then one charter like say modify the store procedure to use 'Update' instead of 'Updated' (diffrence of two characters to 'Inserted')

select 'Update' [operation] ,  @@ROWCOUNT [count]

I get the error:

   DBD::ODBC::st fetchrow_array failed: [Microsoft][ODBC SQL Server Driver]String data, right truncation (SQL-01004)

So in summary, the output looks like

1,Inserted,10

2,Updated,15

3,Inserte ,20

4,Updated,5

Any ideas on why the executions are not independent and what is the best way to solve this problem. I know I can make the actions the same but I would like a better solution.

EDIT: A follow up question. If the UpdateData procedure needed to call another procedure which also returned data. Is it possible in Perl to get both of the result sets. One coming from the inner procedure and one from the outer. Right now, >fetchrow_array only gets the inner result set.

EDIT 2: In regards to the original issue of data truncation I am wondering why does calling $updateData->finish after every execute not cause the width to be reset on every execute. IE

  foreach (@Data) {
       $updateData->execute($->[0], $_->[1]);
       my @row = $updateData->fetchrow_array;
       my ($action, $count) = ($row[0], $row[1]);
       print $row[0] .",$action, $count\n";
       $updateData->finish;
   }
share|improve this question
    
Fascinating. Can you reproduce with a store proc that simply SELECTs 'FOOFOOFOO' or 'FOOFOOFO' depending on its input parameter? If so, can you file a bug with the right DBD maintainer? –  pilcrow Nov 19 '12 at 21:23
    
I'm the right DBD maintainer and don't bother filing a bug in the DBD::ODBC rt queue as I seriously doubt this is a bug in DBD::ODBC. See my answer. If you produce a trace and send it to me I will look at it but I'm pretty sure you are going to find SQLDescribeCol returned 7. –  bohica Nov 20 '12 at 8:43
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2 Answers

It is difficult to attempt to reproduce your problem when we don't know the data in the table. As always with issues like this it is best to try and write a small self contained script which demonstrates the problem. When I attempt to guess at your scenario and run:

use DBI;
use strict;
use warnings;

my $h = DBI->connect('dbi:ODBC:xx','xx','xx',
                     {RaiseError => 1, PrintError => 0});

eval {
    $h->do(q/drop table mje/);
    $h->do(q/drop procedure pmje/);
};

$h->do(<<'EOT');
create table mje (id int, data int)
EOT

#my @data = (1,1,2);
#my $s = $h->prepare(q/insert into mje (id, data) values(?,?)/);
#foreach (@data) {
#    $s->execute($_, $_);
#}

$h->do(<<'EOT');
CREATE PROCEDURE pmje (
    @dataId as int,
    @data as int)
AS
BEGIN
SET NOCOUNT ON;
declare @count int
select @count = (select COUNT(*) from mje where id = @dataId)
if @count = 1
begin
update mje set data = @data from mje where id = @dataId
select 'Updated' [operation] ,  @@ROWCOUNT [count]
end
else
begin
insert into mje (id, data)  values(@dataId, @data)
select 'Inserted' [operation] , @@ROWCOUNT [count]
end
END
EOT

my $s = $h->prepare(q/{call pmje(?,?)}/);
my @data = (1,2,1);
foreach (@data) {
    $s->execute($_, $_);
    my @row = $s->fetchrow_array;
    my ($action, $count) = ($row[0], $row[1]);
    print $row[0] .",$action, $count\n";
 }

I get:

Inserted,Inserted, 1
Updated,Updated, 1
Inserted,Inserted, 1

However, I probably was not using the same ODBC driver as you (I was using the Easysoft SQL Server driver on Linux). The truncation error you see suggests DBD::ODBC bound the column with too small a buffer. DBD::ODBC uses SQLDescribeCol to obtain the size of the buffer required so in your case I'd suggest SQLDescribeCol returned 7 instead of 8. That should be fairly stright forward to prove if you enable DBD::ODBC tracing however, how you do this depends on how recent your DBI and DBD::ODBC are. If you have recent DBI and DBD::ODBC simply:

set DBI_TRACE=DBD=x.log (windows) or export DBI_TRACE=DBD=x.log (unix)

If that does not produce much in x.log

set DBI_TRACE=15=x.log (windows) export DBI_TRACE=15=x.log (unix)

and run your script. When I do that I get a line like this:

   DescribeCol column = 1, name = operation, namelen = 9, type = VARCHAR(12), precision/column size = 8, scale = 0, nullable = 0

which tells me the buffer size returned for the column is 8. You probably got 7 before and 128 now. I don't think anything is broken as such as how would the ODBC driver or database know who big the buffer should be?

share|improve this answer
    
I just tried my version of your script on Windows and got the same result - we've probably got different drivers and database versions. Try going back to your original version and swap the text Inserted/Updated around and this will give you a clue. –  bohica Nov 20 '12 at 8:56
    
bohica, I replied in my answer with a modified version of the script you posted that reproduces the problem on my machine. Could you see if you can reproduce it? –  stas Nov 20 '12 at 14:14
    
It does in deed reproduce your problem. SQLDescribeCol returns 7 for the size of the column now. –  bohica Nov 20 '12 at 15:44
    
It is down to the first string seen. i.e., your example ensures that the first string returned in the 2nd connect is Updated so the column is described at this time as length 7. Then you call it again ensuring the "Inserted" is done - now buffer is too small. An ODBC application cannot be expected to call SQLDescribeCol for every row as row binding would not work. Nothing is going to change in DBD::ODBC to make this work for you so I'd stick with your first workaround and declare a variable. –  bohica Nov 20 '12 at 15:50
    
Slight correction to the above as re-reading it it implies the issue is caused by the client end code. All the driver does is SET FMTONLY to obtain the SQLDescribeCol values and SQL Server is seeing the string in the IF and probably not looking at the one in the else. But that is a guess. –  bohica Nov 20 '12 at 15:59
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

While I still don't know why the behavior is what it is, I did find the solution. IF in the stored procedure one declared a variable into which the output will be placed and the size is large enough, then everything works as it should. Namely, this fixes things:

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[UpdateData] 
    @dataId as int,
    @data as int,
AS
BEGIN 
SET NOCOUNT ON;
declare @operation varchar(128)
declare @count int
select @count = (select COUNT(*) from DataTable data where data.id = @dataId)
if @count = 1
begin
update DataTable set data = @data from DataTable where  data.id = @dataId
set @operation = 'Updated'
select @operation [operation] ,  @@ROWCOUNT [count]
end
else
begin
insert into DataTable (id, data)  values(@dataId, @data)
set @operation = 'Inserted'
select @operation [operation] ,  @@ROWCOUNT [count]
end
END

EDIT: This is a reply to bohicas' post. The following script (which is a slight modification of what he posted reproduces the problem on my machine).

use DBI;
use strict;
use warnings;

my $debug = 0;
my $h = DBI->connect('dbi:ODBC:xx','xx','xx',
                 {RaiseError => 1, PrintError => 0});

eval {
    $h->do(q/drop table mje/);
    $h->do(q/drop procedure pmje/);
};

$h->do(<<'EOT');
create table mje (id int, data int)
EOT

$h->do(<<'EOT');
CREATE PROCEDURE pmje (
    @dataId as int,
    @data as int)
AS
BEGIN
SET NOCOUNT ON;
declare @count int
select @count = (select COUNT(*) from mje where id = @dataId)
if @count = 1
begin
update mje set data = @data from mje where id = @dataId
select 'Updated' [operation] ,  @@ROWCOUNT [count]
end
else
begin
insert into mje (id, data)  values(@dataId, @data)
select 'Inserted' [operation] , @@ROWCOUNT [count]
end
END
EOT

my $s = $h->prepare(q/{call pmje(?,?)}/);
my @data = (1);
foreach (@data) {
    $s->execute($_, $_);
    my @row = $s->fetchrow_array;
    my ($action, $count) = ($row[0], $row[1]);
    print $row[0] .",$action, $count\n";
    $s->finish();
 }
 $h->disconnect();

 $h = getDBHandle($debug);
 $s = $h->prepare(q/{call pmje(?,?)}/);

@data = (1,2);
foreach (@data) {
    $s->execute($_, $_);
    my @row = $s->fetchrow_array;
    my ($action, $count) = ($row[0], $row[1]);
    print $row[0] .",$action, $count\n";
    $s->finish();
 }
share|improve this answer
    
So, in a nutshell, you had to declare @operation before you used it? –  Len Jaffe Nov 19 '12 at 20:07
    
That is a strange way to phrase it. Of course if I used a variable I would need to declare it first. The problem is that you can create a perfectly valid stored procedure without declaring this variable. The SQL would be correct. This is a DBI issue. –  stas Nov 19 '12 at 20:42
    
@LenJaffe, not quite. In a nutshell, specifying an output column as a user-defined variable with known length avoided the very odd behavior of letting the DBD/ODBC driver guess the length of field values returned as literal SELECTions. (That's a big nutshell, I guess.) –  pilcrow Nov 19 '12 at 21:48
    
I just have to ask: When you execute this SP from an SQL prompt, does it return the untruncated @operation? –  Len Jaffe Nov 20 '12 at 16:41
    
Len Jaffe, yes it does. Like I said, the SQL is correct in either case. –  stas Nov 20 '12 at 16:48
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