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I am trying to program a standard snake draft, where team A pick, team B, team C, team C, team B, team A, ad nauseum.

If pick number 13 (or pick number x) just happened how can I figure which team picks next for n number of teams.

I have something like:

def slot(n,x):
    direction = 'down' if (int(x/n) & 1) else 'up'
    spot = (x % n) + 1
    slot = spot if direction == 'up' else ((n+1) - spot)
    return slot

I have feeling there is a simpler, more pythonic what than this solution. Anyone care to take a hack at it?

So I played around a little more. I am looking for the return of a single value, rather than the best way to count over a looped list. The most literal answer might be:

def slot(n, x): # 0.15757 sec for 100,000x 
    number_range = range(1, n+1) + range(n,0, -1)
    index = x % (n*2)
    return number_range[index]

This creates a list [1,2,3,4,4,3,2,1], figures out the index (e.g. 13 % (4*2) = 5), and then returns the index value from the list (e.g. 4). The longer the list, the slower the function.

We can use some logic to cut the list making in half. If we are counting up (i.e. (int(x/n) & 1) returns False), we get the obvious index value (x % n), else we subtract that value from n+1:

def slot(n, x): # 0.11982 sec for 100,000x 
    number_range = range(1, n+1) + range(n,0, -1)
    index = ((n-1) - (x % n)) if (int(x/n) & 1) else (x % n)
    return number_range[index]

Still avoiding a list altogether is fastest:

def slot(n, x): # 0.07275 sec for 100,000x
    spot = (x % n) + 1
    slot = ((n+1) - spot) if (int(x/n) & 1) else spot
    return slot

And if I hold the list as variable rather than spawning one:

number_list = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,12,11,10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1]
def slot(n, x): # 0.03638 sec for 100,000x
    return number_list[x % (n*2)]
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Should team number n, as well as team number 1, pick twice in a row at the turn? –  Duke Silver Nov 19 '12 at 17:25
    
yes. Team 1 and team n have two consecutive picks at the turn. –  Cole Nov 19 '12 at 17:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Why not use itertools cycle function:

from itertools import cycle
li = range(1, n+1) + range(n, 0, -1) # e.g. [1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 3, 2, 1]
it = cycle(li)

[next(it) for _ in xrange(10)] # [1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 3, 2, 1, 1, 2]

Note: previously I had answered how to run up and down, as follows:

it = cycle(range(1, n+1) + range(n, 0, -1)) #e.g. [1, 2, 3, 4, 3, 2, 1, 2, 3, ...]
share|improve this answer
    
order should be [1,2,3,4,4,3,2,1,1,2,...] .. so what else do I do with the cycle function? –  Cole Nov 19 '12 at 17:38
    
@Cole updated... –  Andy Hayden Nov 19 '12 at 17:59

Here's a generator that will fulfill what you want.

def draft(n):
    while True:
        for i in xrange(1,n+1):
            yield i
        for i in xrange(n,0,-1):
            yield i

>>> d = draft(3)
>>> [d.next() for _ in xrange(12)]
[1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1]
share|improve this answer
from itertools import chain, cycle

def cycle_up_and_down(first, last):
    up = xrange(first, last+1, 1)
    down = xrange(last, first-1, -1)
    return cycle(chain(up, down))

turns = cycle_up_and_down(1, 4)
print [next(turns) for n in xrange(10)] # [1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 3, 2, 1, 1, 2]
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