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I have a 2-dimensional array representing selective data from a picture. All the uninteresting data is set to 0. From two indices, I need to find the closest value - geometrically- that is not 0 to the indices (which represent coordinates).

My method so far is to examine, in circles,the values centered on the point of interest, increasing the radius after every circle pass where no non-zero values are found.

This method's complexity appears to be exponential, and the program takes a very long time when the nearest point is further than ~25 pixels away.

Do you have an advice for a different method/an existing algorithm to accomplish this?

Edit: Per request, my current code is below:

        int height;
        int width;
        ushort[,] _2dfat;

        private ushort getAssociatedFat(int centerX, int centerY) 
        {
            int radiusmax = (int)Math.Ceiling(Math.Sqrt(Math.Pow(height,2) + Math.Pow(width, 2) + 1));
            return getAssociatedFat(1, centerX, centerY,radiusmax); 
        }

        private ushort getAssociatedFat(int radius, int centerX, int centerY,int radiusmax) //RECURSIVE METHOD: requires extensive analysis and testing
        {

            ushort max=circleSym8(centerX, centerY, radius);
            if (max != 0) return max;
            else if (radius <= radiusmax)
                return getAssociatedFat(radius + 1, centerX, centerY, radiusmax);
            else 
            { 
                MessageBox.Show("WARNING: empty fat array/image"); 
                return 0; 
            }
        }

        private ushort getMax(ushort max, int x, int y)
        {
            try
            {
                if (_2dfat[y, x] == 0) return max;
                else if (_2dfat[y, x] > max) return _2dfat[y, x];
                else return max;
            }
            catch (IndexOutOfRangeException) { return max; }


        }

        private ushort circleSym8(int xCenter, int yCenter, int radius)
        {
            int x, y, r2;
            r2 = radius * radius;
            ushort max=0;
            max=getMax(max, xCenter, yCenter + radius);
            max = getMax(max, xCenter, yCenter - radius);
            max = getMax(max, xCenter + radius, yCenter);
            max = getMax(max, xCenter - radius, yCenter);

            y = radius;
            x = 1;
            y = (int)(Math.Sqrt(r2 - 1) + 0.5);
            while (x < y)
            {
                max = getMax(max, xCenter + x, yCenter + y);
                max = getMax(max, xCenter + x, yCenter - y);
                max = getMax(max, xCenter - x, yCenter + y);
                max = getMax(max, xCenter - x, yCenter - y);
                max = getMax(max, xCenter + y, yCenter + x);
                max = getMax(max, xCenter + y, yCenter - x);
                max = getMax(max, xCenter - y, yCenter + x);
                max = getMax(max, xCenter - y, yCenter - x);
                x += 1;
                y = (int)(Math.Sqrt(r2 - x * x) + 0.5);
            }
            if (x == y)
            {
                max = getMax(max, xCenter + x, yCenter + y);
                max = getMax(max, xCenter + x, yCenter - y);
                max = getMax(max, xCenter - x, yCenter + y);
                max = getMax(max, xCenter - x, yCenter - y);
            }
            return max;
        }
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You're going to want to post some code –  Jon B Nov 19 '12 at 17:37
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1 Answer

You could store the interesting data as points in a Quadtree or kd-tree and perform range searches that way. Those data structures are optimized for the sort of lookups you're performing and would reduce the complexity of each search.

I envision a sufficient Quadtree implementation providing the following:

// Given some point in the quadtree, walk upwards and outwards
// returning points found ordered by distance
var nearestNeighbor = quadTree.Neighbors(point)
                              .OrderBy(pp => point.Distance(pp))
                              .First();
share|improve this answer
    
I've just learnt 2 new data structures today! Very cool, and sounds very applicable to the above issue. –  killercowuk Nov 19 '12 at 17:40
    
mm, interesting, I have all my work based on two 2d arrays. Do you know of any existing quadtree implementation that can use 2d arrays? –  EdwinG Nov 19 '12 at 20:25
    
You could use the 2D array to insert points into the quadtree. Enumerable.Range(0, array.GetLength(0)).SelectMany(x => Enumerable.Range(0, array.GetLength(1)).Where(y => array[x,y] > 0).Select(y => new Point(x, y))). Better yet, simply two for loops over the array inserting the data into the quadtree. –  user7116 Nov 20 '12 at 0:53
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