Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to set up some Network stuff. For this reason I need to send and receive data over network. In particular HTTP-Messages. I want to implement this with asynchronous Methods in C#. When im receiving the HTTP-Response from a Webserver, I want to receive data until the webserver closed the connection or (connection: keep alive) until i received all bytes of the HTTP-Response. I already tried to set this up method but failed. Can you tell me how to implement this. I've seen this example on msdn:

    private static void Receive(Socket client) {
    try {
        // Create the state object.
        StateObject state = new StateObject();
        state.workSocket = client;

        // Begin receiving the data from the remote device.
        client.BeginReceive( state.buffer, 0, StateObject.BufferSize, 0,
            new AsyncCallback(ReceiveCallback), state);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        Console.WriteLine(e.ToString());
    }
}

private static void ReceiveCallback( IAsyncResult ar ) {
    try {
        // Retrieve the state object and the client socket 
        // from the asynchronous state object.
        StateObject state = (StateObject) ar.AsyncState;
        Socket client = state.workSocket;

        // Read data from the remote device.
        int bytesRead = client.EndReceive(ar);

        if (bytesRead > 0) {
            // There might be more data, so store the data received so far.
        state.sb.Append(Encoding.ASCII.GetString(state.buffer,0,bytesRead));

            // Get the rest of the data.
            client.BeginReceive(state.buffer,0,StateObject.BufferSize,0,
                new AsyncCallback(ReceiveCallback), state);
        } else {
            // All the data has arrived; put it in response.
            if (state.sb.Length > 1) {
                response = state.sb.ToString();
            }
            // Signal that all bytes have been received.
            receiveDone.Set();
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        Console.WriteLine(e.ToString());
    }
}

With the State Object:

public class StateObject {
// Client socket.
public Socket workSocket = null;
// Size of receive buffer.
public const int BufferSize = 256;
// Receive buffer.
public byte[] buffer = new byte[BufferSize];
// Received data string.
public StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
}

If I would use similar code to this, I'm afraid to run into horrible sideeffects because all Threads use the same state-object. Furthermore, I have to resend the data received data immediately.

share|improve this question
    
How about trying HttpListener ? –  L.B Nov 19 '12 at 17:58
    
Or maybe FiddlerCore –  L.B Nov 19 '12 at 18:05
    
Or HttpClient, theres a good intro/article here: blogs.msdn.com/b/henrikn/archive/2012/02/16/… –  Cal279 Nov 19 '12 at 19:54
    
I wanted to keep it low level. If I use HTTPListener I wont have the flexibility like when using the Socket-Class. –  user1826831 Nov 19 '12 at 20:30
add comment

2 Answers 2

HTTP is not a trivial protocol. If you insist on doing this manually, don't bother with threads just yet, start with a single HTTP client connection, figure out proper message parsing and protocol state machine. Once you get that working it'd be much simpler to scale/expand/whatever.

share|improve this answer
    
I know the HTTP-Protocol and how it works. Furthermore I know the Header-Fields I have to filter, how to get the message length, the ip adress ... I already designed a protocol state machine. Its just the threading what makes me mad. A single threaded programm would be much to slow. I could not send and receive Messages in a decent time. Thats why I was asking for a nice way how to receive Messages with async Methods. –  user1826831 Nov 20 '12 at 15:56
    
You create a new state object every time you do new AsyncCallback, so that's not an issue. You need to accumulate read bytes until you can parse enough of the message, so call your protocol state machine after each read to tell you if you need to read more. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Nov 20 '12 at 16:14
    
What you mean is: Instead of client.BeginReceive( state.buffer, 0, StateObject.BufferSize, 0, new AsyncCallback(ReceiveCallback), state); use client.BeginReceive( state.buffer, 0, StateObject.BufferSize, 0, new AsyncCallback(ReceiveCallback), new state(...)); ? Already though about it, but I'm not sure if it is that effective, to create a new State-Object everytime I call the callback-method. Isn't it much better to work on the same Object and synchronize the Threads working on it? –  user1826831 Nov 20 '12 at 16:20
    
No, you are already doing it in you Receive() method - one state per socket (sorry, bad wording on my part in the previous comment). Just don't wait till EOF, parse it as soon as you can. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Nov 20 '12 at 16:29
    
Ok, then I should work on the same Object and synchronize the Threads working on it. Thought about doing the Parsing stuff when I received the full Header (means when I received the /cr/n/cr/n). Would you recommend me to use lock's to synchronize the receiving? –  user1826831 Nov 20 '12 at 16:51
show 2 more comments
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I tried to implement the asynchronous Receive method. Well, its not finished yet, but the basic structure should be clear.

private void BeginReceiveFromWebserver(ClientSocket clientSocket)
    {
        try
        {
            clientSocket.CommunicationSocket.BeginReceive(clientSocket.Buffer, 0, clientSocket.Buffer.Length,
                                                         SocketFlags.None, new AsyncCallback(ReceiveFromWebserverCallback), clientSocket);

        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message + "\nfrom Source: " + e.Source + "\nand Stack Trace: " + e.StackTrace);
            //XXX TODO
        }
    }

    private void ReceiveFromWebserverCallback(IAsyncResult ar)
    {            
        ClientSocket clientSocket = ar.AsyncState as ClientSocket;

        try
        {
            int bytesRead = clientSocket.CommunicationSocket.EndReceive(ar);

            if (bytesRead > 0)
            {
                if(!clientSocket.AllBytesReceived)
                {
                    // No locks needed here, because it works like a loop
                    clientSocket.TotalBytesReceived+=bytesRead;
                    clientSocket.BufferUsed++;
                    clientSocket.AddBuffer();
                    clientSocket.SendingToBrowserCompleted.WaitOne();
                    BeginSend(clientSocket, bytesRead);
                    clientSocket.CommunicationSocket.BeginReceive(clientSocket.Buffer, 0, clientSocket.Buffer.Length,
                                                        SocketFlags.None, new AsyncCallback(ReceiveFromWebserverCallback), clientSocket);
                }
                else
                {
                    // all bytes Received
                }
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Webserver Closed Connection");
                //XXX TODO, Webserver closed the Connection
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message + "\nfrom Source: " + e.Source + "\nand Stack Trace: " + e.StackTrace);
            //XXX TODO
        }
    }

Every peace of the message received, is resendet to Browser. To ensure that the Browser gets those peaces in the right order, I've got the SendingToBrowserCompleted-AutoResetEvent here. If your interested in more code, just ask.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.