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I feel stupid right now, haven't been doing C++ in ages, can't understand what's wrong... However I got this following class:

#include <string>
class NamedObject
{
    public:
        NamedObject();
        virtual ~NamedObject();
        virtual std::string getName() const { return m_name };
        virtual void setName(const std::string name) { m_name = name };
    private:
        std::string m_name;
};

And now I'm inheriting a simple class out of it:

#include "NamedObject.h"
enum eTeam { eAttacker, eDefender, eSpectator, eNone };
class Player : public NamedObject
{
    public:
        Player();
        virtual ~Player();
        virtual void printName();
        virtual eTeam getTeam() const { return m_team };
        virtual void setTeam(const eTeam team) { m_team = team };
    private:
        std::string m_name;
        eTeam m_team;
};

However, I am unable to use player->setName("blabla") from my main.cpp? Here's the main file:

#include "Player.h"
int main()
{
    Player* p1 = new Player();
    p1->setName("Name Changed!")
    p1->printName(); // prints "Unnamed" since I declared that in default ctor
    return 0;
}

I'm not getting any errors, everything runs up well, the name just doesn't simply change. Also, I got all of the constructors and destructors, as well as my printName-method working perfectly, and the problem is not within them.

share|improve this question
    
And it's not the missing ';' after setName() ? –  Wouter Huysentruit Nov 19 '12 at 18:55
    
No it's not, I obviously rewrote the whole code. –  user1632861 Nov 19 '12 at 19:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you see is that setName modifies the m_name in the parent class and printName prints out the m_name of the derived class because you're redeclaring std::string m_name; in the derived class.

Remove the declaration from the derived class and mark m_name as protected member in the parent class:

#include <string>
class NamedObject
{
public:
    NamedObject();
    virtual ~NamedObject();
    virtual std::string getName() const { return m_name };
    virtual void setName(const std::string name) { m_name = name };
protected:
    std::string m_name;
};

You could also keep m_name private and use the method getName() instead, as suggested by moswald.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks to you and thanks to everyone else, I feel so stupid now :D been coding Python too much and simply forgot such a basic thing. –  user1632861 Nov 19 '12 at 18:59
1  
I would avoid making it protected. There's already a getName; he should just use that instead of accessing m_name directly. –  moswald Nov 19 '12 at 19:00
    
Yes I did that already, just didn't notice that I was replacing the m_name. –  user1632861 Nov 19 '12 at 19:04
    
@moswald: idd, thanks for the suggestion –  Wouter Huysentruit Nov 19 '12 at 19:06

You created another different variable m_name in your derived class that shadowed the one in the parent class.

share|improve this answer

I can see that must not be your real code.

Your derived/super class is redeclaring m_name. Probably not what you mean to do;)

share|improve this answer
1  
That doesn't mean it's not his real code. Likely, that's the bug. –  moswald Nov 19 '12 at 18:58
    
It wasn't the real code, but that was the bug. –  user1632861 Nov 19 '12 at 19:02

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