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I'm constructing a linked-list, and this is the list item Struct:

struct TListItemStruct
{
    void* Value;
    struct TListItemStruct* NextItem;
    struct TListItemStruct* PrevItem;
};
typedef struct TListItemStruct TListItem;
typedef TListItem* PListItem;

I use this in several function and it looks ok so far. However when I define the following variable:

PListItem item;

I get the following error:

error C2275: 'PListItem' : illegal use of this type as an expression

Why is that? What's wrong with defining a variable of type pointer to struct?

EDITS: This is more of the function. This doesn't work

BOOL RemoveItem(PListItem item)
{
    // Verify
    if (item == NULL)
    {
        return FALSE;
    }
    // Get prev and next items
    PListItem prev;
    prev = item->PrevItem;
    //PListItem next = (PListItem)(item->NextItem);
 ...

However this works:

BOOL RemoveItem(PListItem item)
{
    PListItem prev;
    // Verify
    if (item == NULL)
    {
        return FALSE;
    }
    // Get prev and next items
    prev = item->PrevItem;
    //PListItem next = (PListItem)(item->NextItem);
 ...

I'm using VS2012, maybe it's a standard thing? to declare vars in the beginning of the function?

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7  
Your problem might be somewhere else in the code causing this specific variable declaration to be parsed incorrectly. –  Jason Nov 19 '12 at 19:00
    
This is a C, C++ problem. The pointer "this" doesn't exist on C, which compiler are you using? What extension is your file? Can you show some more code? –  imreal Nov 19 '12 at 19:04
    
Seems like it's because I've declared the vars in the function body and not right on start. Is this a C issue? –  Nitay Nov 19 '12 at 19:09
    
Yes, before C99 I think, try moving them to the top of the function. –  imreal Nov 19 '12 at 19:11
1  

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

MSVC uses C89, it does not support C99, so you need to either declare all variables at the beginning of your function or compile as C++.

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its not a keyword this –  Ravindra Bagale Nov 19 '12 at 19:06
    
@RavindraBagale this is a keyword in C++ –  mux Nov 19 '12 at 19:08
    
@Cicada it is still a possibility, no ? I've added the error from MSDN anyway –  mux Nov 19 '12 at 19:09
    
@mux:in question that was not a keyword, it showing because of SO's parser –  Ravindra Bagale Nov 19 '12 at 19:11
    
@Cicada yes I get the syntax highlighting thing :) was just saying, anyway I removed that and just left the example –  mux Nov 19 '12 at 19:12

In C89 (which is supported by Visual Studio 2012) you have to declare variables at the beginning of the scope. That's why your latter example works fine.

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