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I am working on a visualization that models the trajectory of an object over a planar surface. Currently, the algorithm I have been provided with uses a simple trajectory function (where velocity and gravity are provided) and Runge-Kutta integration to check n points along the curve for a point where velocity becomes 0. We are discounting any atmospheric interaction.

What I would like to do it introduce a non-planar surface, say from a digital terrain model (raster). My thought is to calculate a Reimann sum at each pixel and determine if the offset from the planar surface is equal to or less than the offset of the underlying topography from the planar surface.

Is it possible, using numpy or scipy, to calculate the height of a Reimann rectangle? Conversely, the area of the rectangle (midpoint is fine) would work, as I know the width nd can calculate the height.

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I'm not really sure what you want to do. It sounds like you want to find the first place an object hits the ground throughout its trajectory. I don't understand why you want to calculate Riemann sums, or what Riemann sums have to do with this problem. –  Matt Nov 19 '12 at 19:13
    
I do want to calculate the first place the object hit the ground. What methodology do you suggest? –  Jzl5325 Nov 19 '12 at 19:14
    
I would, for every point along the trajectory, starting with the earliest, check if the height of the object is <= the height of the terrain. –  Matt Nov 19 '12 at 19:19
    
Looks like scipy.integrate.cumtrapz does what I am looking for. This calculates the Riemann sum using the trapezoidal rule and cumulatively stores the total calculated area. –  Jzl5325 Nov 19 '12 at 19:23
    
Okay, but you shouldn't need to use a Riemann sum, or I just don't understand the problem –  Matt Nov 19 '12 at 22:13
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For computing Reimann sums you could look into numpy.cumsum(). I am not sure if you can do a surface or only an array with this method. However, you could always loop through all the rows of your terrain and store each row in a two dimensional array as you go. Leaving you with an array of all the terrain heights.

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