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I am using Json.net 4.5. I am using JsonConverter to convert the data from one version to another version.

Version 1

    public class AV1
    {
        public string PNr { get; set; } // "x253yN-69Uj"
    }

Version 2

    public class AV2
    {
        public string FirstNr { get; private set; } // "x253yN"
        public string LastNr { get; private set; } // "69Uj"

        public void SetFirstAndLastNr(string a, string b, string c)
        {
            //Logic to set the values of FirstNr and LastNr
        }
    }

In the derived JsonConverter, I am creating the instance of AV2 class. But since properties are readonly properties now, how should i set the value of these properties? Does Json.net offers any methods to do the same? Or do i have to use reflection?

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1  
Why not use the built-in JavaScriptSerializer class? –  Wouter Huysentruit Nov 19 '12 at 19:30
    
@WouterH What would JavaScriptSerializer do Json.net couldn't, in the context of this question? –  L.B Nov 19 '12 at 19:55
    
Not saying it will solve the OP's problem, otherwise I would have posted it as an answer. I'm just curious why ppl still use json.net, they should get it offline if you ask me ;) –  Wouter Huysentruit Nov 19 '12 at 19:58
    
JSON.NET has a lot of nice features which the out-of-the-box serializers don't. It's even been adopted by Microsoft itself as the default serializer for one of their products (ASP.NET Web API). –  carlosfigueira Nov 19 '12 at 20:00
1  
What do the parameters a, b and c mean on the method SetFirstAndLastNr in the class AV2? –  carlosfigueira Nov 19 '12 at 20:01
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2 Answers

As I see no reason why one would use JSON.NET these days, I'll formulate my answer by using the built-in JavaScriptSerializer (add reference to System.Web.Extensions).

Your problem can be solved by keeping the depricated PNr property, but mark it as obsolete so it would generate a compiler error when you try to use PNr directly in code. But it will still work for deserialization:

Code

using System;
using System.Web.Script.Serialization;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        public static JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();

        public class AV1
        {
            public string PNr { get; set; }
        }

        public class AV2
        {
            public string FirstNr { get; protected set; }
            public string LastNr { get; protected set; }
        }

        internal class AV2FromJson : AV2
        {
            // For backwards compatibility
            [Obsolete("Use FirstNr and LastNr instead", true)]
            public string PNr
            {
                set
                {
                    var numbers = value.Split('-');
                    if (numbers.Length != 2)
                        throw new Exception("Invalid format");
                    FirstNr = numbers[0];
                    LastNr = numbers[1];
                }
            }

            // Give FirstNr a public setter for deserialization
            public new string FirstNr
            {
                get { return base.FirstNr; }
                set { base.FirstNr = value; }
            }
            // Give LastNr a public setter for deserialization
            public new string LastNr
            {
                get { return base.LastNr; }
                set { base.LastNr = value; }
            }
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // Create version 1 object
            AV1 av1 = new AV1();
            av1.PNr = "x253yN-69Uj";

            // Serialize version 1 object
            string json = serializer.Serialize(av1);
            Console.WriteLine(json);

            // Deserialize to version 2 object (will use the obsolete PNr here)
            AV2 av2 = serializer.Deserialize<AV2FromJson>(json) as AV2;
            Console.WriteLine(av2.FirstNr);
            Console.WriteLine(av2.LastNr);

            // Serialize version 2 object
            json = serializer.Serialize(av2);
            Console.WriteLine(json);

            // Deserialize to version 2 object (this time using the public setters from AV2FromJson class)
            av2 = serializer.Deserialize<AV2FromJson>(json) as AV2;
            Console.WriteLine(av2.FirstNr);
            Console.WriteLine(av2.LastNr);

            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

Output

{"PNr":"x253yN-69Uj"}
x253yN
69Uj
{"FirstNr":"x253yN","LastNr":"69Uj"}
x253yN
69Uj

Version Tolerant Serialization

Since you're dealing with versions, I can add that there are some neat attributes in order to do Version Tolerant Serialization (mark optional fields, calling methods before and after serialization, add version to fields, etc). You might want to check them out.

EDIT

I have extended the example with a method to bypass protected setters by using an internal 'wrapper' class for deserialization.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice one. But in my application 1.0 has few hundred classes and in version 1.2 few hundred more as a result of many refactoring to make these classes granular (applying SOLID principles, concern separation and so on) and less buggy, but we have only done minimal functional enhancement. Now that I have to add many classes or add properties for backward compatibility, which will be an over kill. Give me a cost effective solution. –  keyr Nov 20 '12 at 4:42
    
I'm afraid that the cost effective solution was to define a proper interface at the start of the project :) you can't avoid duplication if you want to keep backwards compatibility and you need some code to update from one version to the other... –  Wouter Huysentruit Nov 20 '12 at 5:42
    
I have a derived JsonConverter which can do the job of backward compatible property. Only thing currently blocks me is that I have to use reflection to set the private data. So I was thinking since Json in any way deals with private variable using some internal functions which if they expose then it might be handy for me to set the value. BTW as of now i do not need backward compatibility. i.e it is not necessory to open V1.2 file in V1.0 application, But i should be able to open V1.0 file to be opened in V1.2 or later version of application. Hope i have mentioned my requirement clear. –  keyr Nov 20 '12 at 8:16
1  
if your DTO's are in a separate library, you can use internal setters instead of private setters. Json will be able to deserialize the values and they'll still be private to external libraries and applications. –  Wouter Huysentruit Nov 20 '12 at 8:46
    
I can do this for few DTO's but many others are actual domain objects. we will move phase wise to DTO later, but as of now I think i have to deal it with reflection for such domain objects –  keyr Nov 20 '12 at 8:54
show 1 more comment

As you said you have hundreds different classes which needs to be converted, JsonDeserializer might not be the best choice.

It's not a bad idea to look at other solution like AutoMapper: http://automapper.org/ , https://github.com/AutoMapper/AutoMapper

If you spend an hour or two and look at the sample codes, you will find it so powerful and flexible to convert (map) different object to each other.

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