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Ok so let me try this again so that hopefully this ban will be lifted.

If I have a column in a data set that has multiple variables how would I go about creating these dummy variables.

Example: Lets say that I have a column named color it has: Red, Green, Yellow, Blue, Pink, and Grey as options for the color of a car.

What is the best way to turn these variables into factors. without creating a bunch of dummy variables by hand?

Edit: So I did what Greg recommended and this is what I have. I was wondering about the NA output though and was unsure why it is there.

 > data$Trim<-factor(data$Trim)
 > data$Model<-factor(data$Model)
 > data$Type<-factor(data$Type)
 > data=cbind(Price,Mileage,Buick,Cadillac,Chevrolet,Pontiac,SAAB,Saturn,Model,Trim,Type,Cylinder,Liter,Doors,Cruise,Sound,Leather)
 > fit <- lm( Price ~ Mileage+Buick+Cadillac+Chevrolet+Pontiac+SAAB+Saturn+Model+Trim+Type+Cylinder+Liter+Doors+Cruise+Sound+Leather, x=TRUE )
 > summary(fit)

Then I get a message "Coefficients: (21 not defined because of singularities)" and for some of the variables the output is NA.

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2  
There really is no reason for you to make dummy variables yourself. What are you trying to do actually? Most likely you just need to turn your variables into factors and then use that in models instead of directly converting to dummy variables - R will do the conversion for you. –  Dason Nov 19 '12 at 19:28
    
how do you do that? –  Clay Nov 19 '12 at 19:30
    
consider penalized regression ? –  Ben Bolker Nov 19 '12 at 20:26
    
I did not, what would be the difference between penalized and linear regression? –  Clay Nov 19 '12 at 21:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

R will create dummy variables for you automatically, here is a basic example:

> mycars <- mtcars
> mycars$cyl <- factor(mycars$cyl)
> fit <- lm( mpg ~ wt+cyl, data=mycars, x=TRUE )
> summary(fit)

Call:
lm(formula = mpg ~ wt + cyl, data = mycars, x = TRUE)

Residuals:
    Min      1Q  Median      3Q     Max 
-4.5890 -1.2357 -0.5159  1.3845  5.7915 

Coefficients:
            Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
(Intercept)  33.9908     1.8878  18.006  < 2e-16 ***
wt           -3.2056     0.7539  -4.252 0.000213 ***
cyl6         -4.2556     1.3861  -3.070 0.004718 ** 
cyl8         -6.0709     1.6523  -3.674 0.000999 ***
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1 

Residual standard error: 2.557 on 28 degrees of freedom
Multiple R-squared: 0.8374,     Adjusted R-squared:  0.82 
F-statistic: 48.08 on 3 and 28 DF,  p-value: 3.594e-11 

> head(fit$x)
                  (Intercept)    wt cyl6 cyl8
Mazda RX4                   1 2.620    1    0
Mazda RX4 Wag               1 2.875    1    0
Datsun 710                  1 2.320    0    0
Hornet 4 Drive              1 3.215    1    0
Hornet Sportabout           1 3.440    0    1
Valiant                     1 3.460    1    0
> 

The x=TRUE in the call to lm tells it to return the x matrix actually used, which includes the dummy variables. If you don't want to look at the created dummy variables then you can leave that out. See ?contrasts for more detail if you want to set how the dummy variables are created.

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Thank you so much for the great explanation. I did not mean to ask a "dumb" question and get banned from the form board. I just did not know anything about factors and wanted to show everything that I had thought of while doing my analysis. –  Clay Nov 19 '12 at 20:25

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