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In Scala, arrays are always passed by reference, call-by-name, right?

So,

def fun(ar: Array[Int]) = {}

is equal to

def fun(ar: => Array[Int]) = {}

thanks.

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No, they passed as call-by-value. What made you think so? –  om-nom-nom Nov 19 '12 at 19:59
    
Because, I have a function def fun(ar: Array[Int]) = {} which wen called fun(v) is able to modify the array v. It might be because scala arrays, are Java arrays, and in Java objects are call-by-name? –  user583311 Nov 19 '12 at 20:22
    
In java (and in scala too) you're passing all objects around by reference. What you are making is just passing a copy of reference and then working with it (and you can still reach the same object in memory and modify it, because references point at the same place in memory). –  om-nom-nom Nov 19 '12 at 20:29
2  
@om-nom-nom: No, you are not passing objects around by reference, neither in Scala nor in Java. Java is always pass by value. Scala is pass by value, except for arguments corresponding to by-name parameters, where it is pass by name (but also never pass by reference). More precisely, you always pass pointers-to-objects by value, which is also sometimes called call-by-object-sharing or call-by-sharing. –  Jörg W Mittag Nov 19 '12 at 21:00
4  
@om-nom-nom: pass-by-reference means that the callee can modify variables in the caller's scope. Note: I am not talking about modifying shared state. If both the caller and the callee have a pointer to the same mutable object, then mutations of that object will be visible to both. But that's just shared mutable state, nothing to do with pass-by-reference. Pass-by-reference means that the callee can modify the variable itself, not just the object the variable points to. Closures actually capture variables by reference in Scala, there you can see the effect. –  Jörg W Mittag Nov 19 '12 at 21:10
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2 Answers 2

In Scala, arrays are always passed by reference, call-by-name, right?

No. In Scala, just like in Java, C, C++ (by default), C# (by default), Smalltalk, Ruby, Python and pretty much every other object-oriented language ever created, arguments are passed by value.

You can explicitly declare a by-name-parameter, and then (but only then) the arguments corresponding to that parameter will be passed by name. Scala will never pass by reference.

So,

def fun(ar: Array[Int]) = {}

is equal to

def fun(ar: => Array[Int]) = {}

No, it is not. In the first case, the array (or rather the pointer to the array) will be passed by value, and in the second case by name. In neither case will it be passed by reference.

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For further clarification, the following quote from Wikipedia might be helpful:

However, the term "call by sharing" is not in common use; the terminology is inconsistent across different sources. For example, in the Java community, they say that Java is pass-by-value, whereas in the Ruby community, they say that Ruby is pass-by-reference, even though the two languages exhibit the same semantics.

For a C++ programmer, there are imho two points that may lead to confusion when confronted with the terminology used for Scala/Java:

  • A C++ programmer interprets pass-by-value as "the copy constructor is called", which implies that the caller can mutate the passed object without modifying the callee's instance. This is not the case for Scala/Java. When a Java programmer claims Java is call-by-value, I always translate this into "object references are passed-by-value".
  • The possible modification of an object resembles C++'s reference arguments (the caller operates on the same instances). From this point of view, one may conclude that Scala uses call-by-reference. But call-by-reference is defined by a possible reassignment of the passed argument. This is not possible with Scala. Since the evaluation strategy is neither (C++ like) pass-by-value nor pass-by-reference I think the term pass-by-sharing is most appropriate.
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"References" (when used in Java, etc.) mean pointers to objects. And they do exactly resemble pointers to objects in C++, with exactly the C++-like pass-by-value semantics of object pointers. –  newacct Nov 20 '12 at 18:21
    
And this is exactly the source of a lot of confusion: A C++ programmer deliberately distinguishes between "pointers to objects" and "references" because they are different language concepts. When he says "pass an object as reference" he refers to passing an object reference by value. I just wanted to allude to that terminology problem. –  bluenote10 Nov 21 '12 at 12:17
    
I am just pointing out that "The possible modification of an object resembles C++'s reference arguments" is not very true. They do not resemble that. Passing in Java/Scala exactly resembles C++'s object pointers. And from this point of view, one would conclude it is pass by value. –  newacct Nov 21 '12 at 20:19
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