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Can someone please post a working example of the PropertyChangedMessage being used? The description from the GalaSoft site states:

PropertyChangedMessage: Used to broadcast that a property changed in the sender. Fulfills the same purpose than the PropertyChanged event, but in a less tight way.

However, this doesn't seem to work:

private bool m_value = false;
public bool Value
{
    get { return m_value ; }
    set 
    { 
        m_value = value;
        Messenger.Default.Send(new PropertyChangedMessage<bool>(m_value, true, "Value"));
    }
share|improve this question
    
I've never used mvvm-light, but wouldn't the Messenger.Default.Send() need to be inside the property setter? –  CodingGorilla Nov 19 '12 at 20:06
    
Technically, any receiver that registers for the message (i.e. the UI) should not care where it gets sent from. But to be practical, you're right. It would most likely appear in the setter. However, it works no better in the setter. –  Big Tuna Nov 19 '12 at 20:21
1  
What do you expect from the code? As far as I know, the PropertyChangedMessage does not replace the PropertyChanged event (so WPF bindings won't work automatically with this). The idea is that other classes register for this message and react acordingly –  Daniel Castro Nov 19 '12 at 20:23
1  
It 'fulfills the same purpose than the PropertyChanged event'. It does not mean it replaces that event –  Daniel Castro Nov 19 '12 at 20:31
1  
@DanielCastro What do I expect from the code? I expect the constructor of the PropertyChangedMessage class to automatically call RaisePropertyChanged. At least that's how I understood the documentation. It appears that I understood it wrong, but I still want that functionality so I wrote my own answer. When I have enough rep, I'll upvote your comment since it led me to a solution. –  Big Tuna Nov 19 '12 at 21:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Daniel Castro commented on my question with the following question: "What do you expect from the code?"

The answer to this question prompted me to write this answer to my own question.

My expectations were, based on the badly written description for the PropertyChangedMessage class in the MVVM-Light documentation, that when I sent a PropertyChangedMessage then the RaisePropertyChanged method on the ViewModelBase class would get automatically called.

Apparently, however, it's the other way around. When you call RaisePropertyChanged, then that method has an overload where you can set a flag which determines whether or not a PropertyChangedMessage will be sent.

However, I want the functionality that I originally expected. I want to send off a new PropertyChangedMessage that automatically causes RaisePropertyChanged to be called. Here's how to do that.

Derive a new class from ViewModelBase with the following public NotifyPropertyChanged method which simply calls the protected RaisePropertyChanged method:

public abstract class MyViewModelBase : GalaSoft.MvvmLight.ViewModelBase
{
    public void NotifyPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        RaisePropertyChanged(propertyName);
    }
}

Then derive a new class from PropertyChangedMessage which calls the new NotifyPropertyChanged method:

public class MyPropertyChangedMessage<T> : PropertyChangedMessage<T>
{
    public MyPropertyChangedMessage(object sender, T oldValue, T newValue, string propertyName)
        : base(sender, oldValue, newValue, propertyName)
    {
        var viewModel = sender as MyViewModelBase;

        if (viewModel != null)
        {
            viewModel.NotifyPropertyChanged(propertyName);
        }
    }

    public MyPropertyChangedMessage(object sender, object target, T oldValue, T newValue, string propertyName)
        : base(sender, target, oldValue, newValue, propertyName)
    {
        var viewModel = sender as MyViewModelBase;

        if (viewModel != null)
        {
            viewModel.NotifyPropertyChanged(propertyName);
        }
    }
}

I have tested this approach and verified that I can indeed write code like the following which causes the UI to update properly:

private bool m_value = false;
public bool Value
{
    get { return m_value; }
    set
    {
        Messenger.Default.Send(new MyPropertyChangedMessage<bool>(this, m_value, value, "Value"));
        m_value = value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I find your expectations a bit strange, but it's fine. One tip: You can replace if (sender is MyViewModelBase) { var viewModel = sender as MyViewModelBase; viewModel.NotifyPropertyChanged(propertyName); } to var viewModel = sender as MyViewModelBase; if(viewModel != null) // Actions.. The as operator tries to cast the variable to a certain type, and returns null if it can't (or if it was already null) PD. I think you can mark your post as answer –  Daniel Castro Nov 19 '12 at 21:28
    
Thanks for the reminder. I updated the answer. –  Big Tuna Nov 19 '12 at 21:42

This is related with the MVVM Light Messenger.

In your property definition yo use like this:

public string Name {
    get
    {
        return _name;
    }
     set
    {
        if (_name == value)
        {
            return;
        }
         var oldValue = _name;
        _name = value;
         // Update bindings and broadcast change using GalaSoft.MvvmLight.Messenging
        RaisePropertyChanged(Name, oldValue, value, true);
    }
}

Then you can suscribe to any modification on the property using something like this:

Messenger.Default.Register<PropertyChangedMessage<string>>(
    this, (e) => this.Name = e.NewValue
);

Look at this post and read about the MVVM Light Messenger

To broadcast:

Messenger.Default.Send<PropertyChangedMessage<string>>(oldValue, newValue, "PropertyName");
share|improve this answer
    
The definition of the message says it's used to broadcast and essentially replaces the PropertyChangedEvent in a "less tight way". The PropertyChangedMessage class has a contructor that takes parameters and the documentation indicates that the Messenger class can be used to send one, not just register for one. I need to know how to broadcast such a message. –  Big Tuna Nov 19 '12 at 20:18
    
BTW, I'm very familiar with the MVVM Light Messenger. However, the PropertyChangedMessage is the only one that I can't get to behave as indicated by the documentation. –  Big Tuna Nov 19 '12 at 20:23
    
If you are already familiar with the messenger it should be pretty simple to understand! it is meant for firing messages when you update a property, thats why RaisePropertyChanged does it automatically. If you want to do it manually you can ofcourse broadcast the message (it is an ordinary class, see updated answer). The replacement to make the code "less tight" is refering to the INPC, you are going to be registering to a message from the messenger instance and not to an event of some other object. –  Salvador Sarpi Nov 19 '12 at 20:46
    
I guess I wasn't being clear. I know how to register for AND broadcast the message. What I was expecting after the broadcasting of the message was for RaisePropertyChanged to be automatically called. The documentation for the PropertyChangedMessage seemed to suggest this. –  Big Tuna Nov 19 '12 at 21:11
1  
I ended up deriving from PropertyChangedMessage to add the functionality of automatically calling RaisePropertyChanged. –  Big Tuna Nov 19 '12 at 21:12

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