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Winkleson here! I am currently learning Python when I got stuck on a problem. I've gotten to the point where I'm dizzy just thinking about it :P Anyways any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance!

Question:


Interlock

Create a function that takes two strings that are the same length or within one character of the same length as parameters. It should then take these two strings and interlock them, taking one character from each string, interlocking them. If the strings are different lengths, then the result should always start with the longer string.

My Coding (sorry I'm a beginner and it's not very Pythonic :P):


def interlock(s1, s2):

    r = 0
    l1 = []
    l2 = []
    inters = ''

    for i in range(len(s1)):

            l1.append(i)

    for i in range(len(s2)):

            l2.append(i)

    if len(s2) == len(s1):        

        for i in range(len(s1)):
            inters += ''.join(s1[i])
            inters += ''.join(s2[i])                

    elif len(s1) < len(s2):

        for i in range(len(s1)):
            inters += ''.join(s2[i])
            inters += ''.join(s1[i])
            r = i

        inters += ''.join(s2[r])

    elif len(s2) < len(s1):

        for i in range(len(s2)):
            inters += ''.join(s1[i])
            inters += ''.join(s2[i])
            r = i

        inters += ''.join(s1[r])

    else:
        pass

    return inters

Results (what results I recieve):

___________________________________________________________________________________________

 Call                   Expected    Received    Correct

 interlock('shoe','cold')   schooled    schooled    true

 interlock('flat','etry')   feltarty    feltarty    true

 **interlock('ab','siy')    saiby           saibi           false**

 **interlock('abalone','hammer')    ahbaamlmoenre   ahbaamlmoenrn   false**

 interlock('','a')          a           a           true

___________________________________________________________________________________________

The two bolder fields are where I am having the most issues. If I try to add in the last characters I get a mysterious out of range exception. Any ideas/solutions would be greatly appreciated! - Winkleson

P.s This is shorter than my normal posts... Usually I'll give an (un)accurate idea on what I'm think I'm doing wrong and it drags on and on and on and on.... you get the idea. Anyways I probably broke my loops like an idiot. So... Goodluck!

THANKS

Thank you everyone who suggested ways to become a better programmer! I don't get much time in a day to program so it's great when so many people take time out of their day to suggest stuff. I love this website and it's community :)

share|improve this question
    
@Marcin Thanks for the edit :P –  Winkleson Nov 19 '12 at 20:07
    
A few comments. join is unnecessary here. You could just do inters += s1[i], etc. Also, to break a string into a list is as easy as list(s1) –  mgilson Nov 19 '12 at 20:09
    
I really want to answer ''.join(itertools.chain(*zip(s1, s2))), but that doesn't meet your requirements. :( What a shame. –  cdhowie Nov 19 '12 at 20:12
1  
@cdhowie -- izip_longest(s1,s2,fill_value='') ;-) –  mgilson Nov 19 '12 at 20:12
    
Also, I think you want to start with r = 1 and use r = i+1. –  mgilson Nov 19 '12 at 20:13
show 6 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

While others are showing you how to do this using itertools (which is a very useful exercise), this will hopefully demonstrate how to write your function to help you learn some basic programming:

def interlock(s1, s2):

    r = 1
    l1 = list(s1)
    l2 = list(s2)
    inters = ''
    if len(s2) == len(s1):        
        for i in range(len(s1)):
            inters += s1[i]
            inters += s2[i]

    elif len(s1) < len(s2):
        for i in range(len(s1)):
            inters += s2[i]
            inters += s1[i]
            r = i+1
        inters += s2[r]

    elif len(s2) < len(s1):
        for i in range(len(s2)):
            inters += s1[i]
            inters += s2[i]
            r = i+1

        inters += s1[r]

    else:
        pass

    return inters


a = interlock('abalone','hammer')
print (a)
print (a[::2])
print (a[1::2])
a = interlock('hammer','abalone')
print (a)
print (a[::2])
print (a[1::2])
a = interlock('ab','siy')
print (a)

I've purposefully kept a lot of the structure from your original code, only removing the pieces which are completely unnecessary (e.g. your excessive use of str.join).

share|improve this answer
    
Thankyou. This is exactly what I was looking for :P However, I suppose I should start looking into the more complicated modules. One thing I don't understand is why defining r within the for loop worked while just adding a position change of +1 did not. Any particular reason? –  Winkleson Nov 19 '12 at 20:28
    
@Winkleson I wouldn't say that any of the other solutions introduce more "complicated" modules. They're using tried and tested solutions - would you write your own btree anymore, or write your "+" operator at machine code level, but yes - best not forget that while using Python we are spoilt on all levels and someone somewhere should still know these :) +1 mgilson - as always ;) –  Jon Clements Nov 19 '12 at 20:32
    
Also... Yes I get a bit excessive when coding... I tend to do extra when I really can do a simple function (IE: Attaching every char to the lists instead of just declaring the lists as list of the string...). –  Winkleson Nov 19 '12 at 20:32
1  
The key here is that Python contains so much syntatic shortcuts that python code tends to be much smaller than equivalent C code. That's why being "pythonic" is so sought after by python newcomers. –  heltonbiker Nov 19 '12 at 20:37
1  
@Marcin What do you consider "the basics" in this context? –  Jon Clements Nov 19 '12 at 20:43
show 11 more comments

Perhaps this could be shortened, but I think this is fairly pythonic without being too much pythonic, besides it doesn't use too much black magic, and no imports:

def interlock(s1, s2):
    if len(s1) < len(s2):
        s1, s2 = s2, s1

    s1, s2 = map(list, [s1, s2])
    for i in xrange(len(s2)):
        s1.insert((2*i+1), s2[i])
    print ''.join(s1)

Now some Python teaching:

  • s1, s2 = s2, s1 is a very pythonic way to swap two variables. I used it to be sure that s1 is the longest string;
  • map is used to map the function list() to the list of strings [s1, s2], converting them to lists of single character strings;
  • insert is a list method (strings don't have it) used to insert an item in the middle of a sequence, at a given position;
  • The (2*i + 1) part is necessary because it's necessary to insert between every other item of s1;
  • ''.join() is a string operation, used here to join the resulting list of characters into a single string, using an empty string, or "nothing" ('') as a separator or "joining element".

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting. If I changed xrange() -> range() would it work in 3.x? Once again not knowing alot of python's Data types hinders my ability to problemsolve again :P –  Winkleson Nov 19 '12 at 20:30
    
The only difference between range and xrange is that the first creates a list first, and then iterates over its elements, while the second creates a generator, and yields one item at a time. This is useful when creating a whole list at first would consume too much memory or processing time, but for shorter examples like this one there is not much practical difference. I believe both would work with this code, but best practices recommend using xrange in loops, and that's what you're going to find out in tutorials. –  heltonbiker Nov 19 '12 at 20:34
    
Thanks for the breakdown! I am currently just learning things by asking questions, looking up modules and running through problemset questions on singpath.appspot.com. ANyways thanks again! –  Winkleson Nov 19 '12 at 20:39
2  
I think it's also worth noting that xrange isn't strictly a generator -- It's an object which is iterable like range, but doesn't store a list. This becomes important because in a lot of ways, xrange really does behave like a list. a = xrange(4); a[3] is possible (which doesn't fly with generators) -- In other words, xrange is like a generator, but it's cooler in most ways -- one drawback is that you can't do next(xrange(10)) ... –  mgilson Nov 19 '12 at 21:10
1  
@Winkleson yeah, I just used print to get you the idea. The good practice is this: if the function should just print, then you end it with a print(the_result) and call it like function(). Now if you want to use the return value somewhere else and also would like to print it (for debugging, for example), then you should use return the_result as the last line of the function, and call it like some_result = function(); print(some_result). –  heltonbiker Nov 20 '12 at 18:54
show 5 more comments

Try something making use of itertools:

def interlock(s1, s2):
    if len(s2) > len(s1):
        (s1, s2) = (s2, s1)

    return ''.join(itertools.chain(*itertools.izip_longest(s1, s2, fillvalue='')))
share|improve this answer
1  
I don't think this is entirely helpful to a beginner. –  Marcin Nov 19 '12 at 20:18
    
@Marcin Learning how to use a language effectively seems helpful to me. –  cdhowie Nov 19 '12 at 20:19
    
Sure, and apple pie is good. It doesn't mean that exhibiting an apple pie makes everyone able to afford apple pies. –  Marcin Nov 19 '12 at 20:20
2  
This isn't a recipe, this is the pie. –  Marcin Nov 19 '12 at 20:21
2  
@cdhowie I think that, some weeks from now, Winkleston would be able to come back and recognize where he was wrong and what is happening with all that itertools stuff, but not now. It is very difficult for advanced users to recognize the difficulties faced by absolute beginners, and I can tell this from both sides. Just a thought. –  heltonbiker Nov 19 '12 at 20:30
show 4 more comments

You need to engage in some data-driven programming:

s1,s2 = sorted(("foo","baxer"), key=len, reverse=True)

Now, you now that your input has a fixed relationship.

Python also has a number of tools in the itertools module which can help you achieve this more easily.

Here's a simplified version of mgilson's code above:

def interlock(in1, in2):
    r = 1
    s1,s2 = sorted((in1,in2), key=len, reverse=True)
    inters = ''
    for i in range(len(s1)):
        inters += s2[i]
        inters += s1[i]
        r = i+1
    if r < len(s2):
        inters += s2[r]

    return inters

You can see that simply making your data correspond to a particular invariant removes the need for two thirds of the code.

share|improve this answer
    
I would use key=len, reverse=True. Saves a lambda –  mgilson Nov 19 '12 at 20:15
    
@Marcin Yeah I not dip into lamda at the present time. I'd rather become very proficent with my loops first. Thanks for your input though! –  Winkleson Nov 19 '12 at 20:16
    
@mgilson even better. –  Marcin Nov 19 '12 at 20:16
    
@Winkleson Lambda abstraction and iteration are not alternatives. In addition, the point of this is not lambda abstraction, it is that your code should work on data, not be a giant list of cases to handle all possible inputs. –  Marcin Nov 19 '12 at 20:17
    
@Marcin Okay, Okay... I'll give it a try. In the meantime can you point out why the last character for elif1 and elif2 are not printing? And furthermore why s1[r+1] would be out of range if s2 < s1? –  Winkleson Nov 19 '12 at 20:22
show 2 more comments

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