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Is there a "groovy" way to sort a collection by a first parameter, and if the first parameter repeats in two or more elements sort it by a second parameter (the second parameter being an array) ?

Example:

edited (Lenght of the sub array is variable):

[1, [1,2,3]]
[1, [4,6]]
[2, [1,2,3,4,5]]
[3, [1,2,3]]
[3, [1,2,4,5]]

Thanks in advance

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use the .sort if you want to build up a custom sort:

def lis = []

lis << [3, [1,2,4]]
lis << [1, [1,2,3]]
lis << [3, [1,2,3]]
lis << [1, [4,5,6]]
lis << [2, [1,2,3]]

lis.sort{a,b->
    if(a[0]==b[0])
    {
        def aArray = a[1]
        def bArray = b[1]
        for(int i=0;i<aArray.size();i++)
        {
            if(bArray[i])
            {
                if(aArray[i]!=bArray[i])
                {
                    return aArray[i]<=>bArray[i]
                }
            }
            else
            {
                return 1
            }
        }    
        return 0
    }
    else
        return a[0]<=>b[0]
}


lis.each{x->
println x
}

I didn't really deal well with the case that the lists are different lengths you could improve on that for your apps needs.

share|improve this answer
    
In my case, my arrays have always two elements, and the sub array had variable lenght and you dealt very well with that. Thank you very much. –  Johnny C. Nov 20 '12 at 14:50
    
Right now if the sub array had 1,2,3 compared to 1,2,3,4 it would show them as equal as it would exit the for loop being done with the aArray, in that case you may want to figure out what to do based on your application for example it might make sense to consider missing numbers 0 for comparison or you may treat them as max or min of numbers. –  Jeff Beck Nov 20 '12 at 14:53
    
I did this, insted of return 0, I returned: return aArray.size() <=> bArray.size() because if the arrays have the same numbers it really doesn't matter. But it matter if bArray is longer, and in that case, I'll put the shorter array first. –  Johnny C. Nov 20 '12 at 16:18
    
Sounds good. Glad its working for you. –  Jeff Beck Nov 20 '12 at 21:53

Have a look at the following gist of tim yates.

It shows a way how to sort a list with multiple comparators.

For your example:

Collection.metaClass.sort = { boolean mutate, Closure... closures ->
    delegate.sort( mutate ) { a, b ->
        closures.findResult { c -> c( a ) <=> c( b ) ?: null }
    }
} 

def list = [[3, [1,2,3]],
                [1, [4,5,6]],
                [2, [1,2,3]],
                [1, [1,2,3]],
                [3, [1,2,4]]]

assert list.sort(false, {it[0]}, {it[1][0]}, {it[1][1]}, {it[1][2]}) == [[1, [1,2,3]],
                                                                         [1, [4,5,6]],
                                                                         [2, [1,2,3]],
                                                                         [3, [1,2,3]],
                                                                         [3, [1,2,4]]] 

Hopes that helps ...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, and sorry I forgot to mention but I don't know the lenght of the sub array, and it can be variable in each element. –  Johnny C. Nov 20 '12 at 12:39
    
How should the arrays be compared? –  aiolos Nov 20 '12 at 12:45
    
Jeff answer works pretty well. But yours its a great idea when you know the lenght. Thanks to you too. –  Johnny C. Nov 20 '12 at 14:45

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