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Assume we need to call fortran function, which returns some values, in python program. I found out that rewriting fortran code in such way:

subroutine pow2(in_x, out_x)
      implicit none
      real, intent(in)      :: in_x
!f2py real, intent(in, out) :: out_x
      real, intent(out)     :: out_x
      out_x = in_x ** 2
      return
end

and calling it in python in such way:

import modulename
a = 2.0
b = 0.0
b = modulename.pow2(a, b)

gives us working result. Can I call fortran function in other way, cause I think the first way is a bit clumsy?

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Consider using IPython? –  inspectorG4dget Nov 19 '12 at 21:08
    
How it can help me? As far as I know it's sort of upgraded interactive mode. –  user983302 Nov 19 '12 at 21:12
1  
It also allows you to interface with other programs such as R, MATLAB, and <drumroll /> FORTRAN. Check out this video –  inspectorG4dget Nov 19 '12 at 21:26
    
what's the problem with what you have? How do you want to call it? –  mgilson Nov 19 '12 at 21:29
    
@mgilson I suppose there will be situations where I'll need to update lots of fortran code in mentioned way, but I don't want to do it cause I'm not crazy and don't have time to do it. –  user983302 Nov 19 '12 at 21:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I think you just need to change your f2py function signature slightly (so that out_x is only intent(out) and in_x is only intent(in)):

subroutine pow2(in_x, out_x)
  implicit none
  real, intent(in)   :: in_x
  !f2py real, intent(in) :: in_x
  real, intent(out)     :: out_x
  !f2py real, intent(out) :: out_x
  out_x = in_x ** 2
  return
end subroutine pow2

Now compile:

f2py -m test -c test.f90

Now run:

>>> import test
>>> test.pow2(3)   #only need to pass intent(in) parameters :-)
9.0
>>>

Note that in this case, f2py is able to correctly scan the signature of the function without the special !f2py comments:

!test2.f90
subroutine pow2(in_x, out_x)
  implicit none
  real, intent(in)   :: in_x
  real, intent(out)     :: out_x
  out_x = in_x ** 2
  return
end subroutine pow2

Compile:

f2py -m test2 -c test2.f90

run:

>>> import test2
>>> test2.pow2(3)   #only need to pass intent(in) parameters :-)
9.0
>>>
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Wow, that's awesome! This way even can return multiple variables in tuple! Just because of my curiosity if there are some other tricks I won't tick this answer right now. –  user983302 Nov 19 '12 at 21:43
    
I'm frequently impressed by how easy it is to wrap fortran code with f2py. Because of that, I've never bothered to learn any of the python C API or even Cython although at some point I'd like to pick up those skills. –  mgilson Nov 19 '12 at 21:45

Another benefit to avoiding intent(inout) arguments is (with a few other restrictions) the resulting function can be considered PURE. This is related to the no-side-effects approach taken by functional languages and pays off with better optimization and error detection by the Fortran compiler and is especially important for auto-parallelization.

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