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I see a lot of people have asked similar questions, so please forgive if I'm repeating but I couldn't find the answer in other posts.

This is just a test page, running on localhost. I have an HTML login page, sending form data to PHP script, which is checking details in a MySQL db. Playing with setting a cookie with results, but can't get it to work.

$user = $_POST['USER'];
$pass = $_POST['PASS'];

$res = $con->query("SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = '".$user."' AND password = '".$pass."'");
$row_no = $res->num_rows;
if ($row_no > 0) {
    $row = $res->fetch_assoc();
    $username = $row['username'];
    $password = $row['password'];

    setcookie('cookie1', $user, time() + 3600);

    if (isset($_COOKIE['cookie1'])) {
        echo "cookie set";
    }
    else {
        echo 'cookie not set';
    }

    echo "Hello " . $username . ', your password is ' . $password;
}
else {
    echo "Sorry, either your username or password is wrong";
}

I think I understand that the cookie isn't available on the page for which it is set, but even if I reload the page the $_COOKIE variable is empty. The result of the isset part of the script is always 'cookie not set'. I have also tried setting the domain on the cookie to '/'.

Any help gratefully received.

(ps the MySQL part works fine)

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3  
Obligatory: Your code is vulnerable to SQL injection –  Esailija Nov 19 '12 at 22:16
    
What happens if an user post it's password as: "";'delete from users;' ??? –  Bruno Vieira Nov 19 '12 at 22:19
    
Your cookie life is only 1 hour. Check to see if the server isn't 1 hour behind the client browser. See my post below for details. –  Ray Nov 19 '12 at 22:29
    
Thanks for the injection reminders. This is a test page on localhost. I will of course sanitise if I make it live. –  chrxr Nov 20 '12 at 8:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Doing something like

setcookie(...);
var_dump($_COOKIE[...]);

will always fail.

In it's default state on processing a user request the $_COOKIE superglobal represents an array of data of all cookies sent from the browser along with the request. The setcookie() function does nothing to alter this array for the request that is currently being processed.

It should however show up on the next request from the user.

If for some reason, you wanted your current request processing logic to "understand" that a cookie being sent back with the response headers has been set, you can manually set the value in the $_COOKIE array like:

setcookie(...);
$_COOKIE[...] = 'some value';
var_dump($_COOKIE);

You also need to verify that you have not sent any output to the browser before using setcookie(). If you are developing with display_errors on and error_reporting(E_ALL) you should see a warning. Also you can look in basic web development tools for your browser to inspect the response headers to see if the cookie is being sent.

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Thanks for the answer. I was actually reloading the same page to force a new request for the cookie. I changed the JS to redirect to another page on the domain and it began working. But your answer has given me a better understanding of why this is the case. –  chrxr Nov 20 '12 at 8:21

The reason why this isn't working is because as Ray pointed out, the cookie is available on the next page requested. The reason for this is because the cookie information is transferred in the HTTP header. So your code is basically doing this:

-Hey, when I send this page to the user, tell him to create this cookie.

-(Before sending the page to the user) Hey, use the cookie that the user has.

But he doesn't have that cookie yet because you haven't sent the page to him (and therefore the HTTP header wasn't sent yet telling him to create the cookie)

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Click here for PHP Documentation on setcookie();

setcookie() defines a cookie to be sent along with the rest of the HTTP headers. Like other headers, cookies must be sent before any output from your script (this is a protocol restriction). This requires that you place calls to this function prior to any output, including and tags as well as any whitespace.

Once the cookies have been set, they can be accessed on the next page load with the $_COOKIE or $HTTP_COOKIE_VARS arrays. Note, superglobals such as $_COOKIE became available in PHP 4.1.0. Cookie values also exist in $_REQUEST.

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from http://php.net/manual/en/function.setcookie.php

Once the cookies have been set, they can be accessed on the next page load with the $_COOKIE or $HTTP_COOKIE_VARS arrays. Note, superglobals such as $_COOKIE became available in PHP 4.1.0. Cookie values also exist in $_REQUEST.

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Also, check the time on the client and server. Your server is setting the cookie to live an hour from the time it currently has. Lifetime of cookies is determined by the client--the browser may be discarding the cookie immediately if the time on the client browser is more than an hour ahead of the server. You can test this by setting the cookie significantly longer, like time() + 36000 (10 hours).

The cookie is available in the $_COOKIE array on the NEXT PAGE REQUESTED and NOT in the current page right after your setcookie() call.

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I suppose using session variables would work, without rewriting his code much. –  Blazemonger Nov 19 '12 at 22:17
    
Op explicitly said, "I think I understand that the cookie isn't available on the page for which it is set, but even if I reload the page the $_COOKIE variable is empty." –  Madbreaks Nov 19 '12 at 22:18

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