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I am developing a WCF REST service where requests are authenticated using basic authentication over SSL. However, before I send the authentication challenge I want to ensure that the request is valid using a pre-shared API key. I do not want the key value passed in the URL so is a custom HTTP header the best solution? Something like X-APIKey: keyvalue.

I am authenticating the user's credentials in a HttpModule:

public void OnAuthenticateRequest(object source, EventArgs eventArgs)
    {
        HttpApplication app = (HttpApplication)source;

        if (!app.Request.IsSecureConnection)
        {
            app.Response.StatusCode = 403;
            app.Response.StatusDescription = "SSL Required";
            app.Response.End();
            return;
        }

        string authHeader = app.Request.Headers[AUTH_HEADER];
        if (authHeader == null)
        {
            app.Response.StatusCode = 401;
            app.Response.End();
            return;
        }

        ClientCredentials credentials = ClientCredentials.FromHeader(authHeader);
        if (credentials.Authenticate())
        {
            app.Context.User = new GenericPrincipal(new GenericIdentity(credentials.Id), null);
        }
        else
        {
            DenyAccess(app);
        }
    }
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That's a good alternative (passing it in a header). You can then use a custom message inspector to validate that the shared key is present in all requests for a specific endpoint, as shown in the code below.

public class StackOverflow_13463251
{
    const string SharedKeyHeaderName = "X-API-Key";
    const string SharedKey = "ThisIsMySharedKey";
    [ServiceContract]
    public interface ITest
    {
        [WebGet(ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json)]
        string Echo(string text);
        [WebGet(ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json)]
        int Add(int x, int y);
    }
    public class Service : ITest
    {
        public string Echo(string text)
        {
            return text;
        }
        public int Add(int x, int y)
        {
            return x + y;
        }
    }
    public class ValidateSharedKeyInspector : IEndpointBehavior, IDispatchMessageInspector
    {
        public void AddBindingParameters(ServiceEndpoint endpoint, BindingParameterCollection bindingParameters)
        {
        }

        public void ApplyClientBehavior(ServiceEndpoint endpoint, ClientRuntime clientRuntime)
        {
        }

        public void ApplyDispatchBehavior(ServiceEndpoint endpoint, EndpointDispatcher endpointDispatcher)
        {
            endpointDispatcher.DispatchRuntime.MessageInspectors.Add(this);
        }

        public void Validate(ServiceEndpoint endpoint)
        {
        }

        public object AfterReceiveRequest(ref Message request, IClientChannel channel, InstanceContext instanceContext)
        {
            HttpRequestMessageProperty httpReq = request.Properties[HttpRequestMessageProperty.Name] as HttpRequestMessageProperty;
            string apiKey = httpReq.Headers[SharedKeyHeaderName];
            if (!SharedKey.Equals(apiKey))
            {
                throw new WebFaultException<string>("Missing api key", HttpStatusCode.Unauthorized);
            }

            return null;
        }

        public void BeforeSendReply(ref Message reply, object correlationState)
        {
        }
    }
    static void SendRequest(string uri, bool includeKey)
    {
        string responseBody = null;
        Console.WriteLine("Request to {0}, {1}", uri, includeKey ? "including shared key" : "without shared key");

        HttpWebRequest req = (HttpWebRequest)HttpWebRequest.Create(uri);
        req.Method = "GET";
        if (includeKey)
        {
            req.Headers[SharedKeyHeaderName] = SharedKey;
        }

        HttpWebResponse resp;
        try
        {
            resp = (HttpWebResponse)req.GetResponse();
        }
        catch (WebException e)
        {
            resp = (HttpWebResponse)e.Response;
        }

        Console.WriteLine("HTTP/{0} {1} {2}", resp.ProtocolVersion, (int)resp.StatusCode, resp.StatusDescription);
        foreach (string headerName in resp.Headers.AllKeys)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", headerName, resp.Headers[headerName]);
        }

        Console.WriteLine();
        Stream respStream = resp.GetResponseStream();
        responseBody = new StreamReader(respStream).ReadToEnd();
        Console.WriteLine(responseBody);

        Console.WriteLine();
        Console.WriteLine("  *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*  ");
        Console.WriteLine();
    }
    public static void Test()
    {
        string baseAddress = "http://" + Environment.MachineName + ":8000/Service";
        ServiceHost host = new ServiceHost(typeof(Service), new Uri(baseAddress));
        ServiceEndpoint endpoint = host.AddServiceEndpoint(typeof(ITest), new WebHttpBinding(), "");
        endpoint.Behaviors.Add(new WebHttpBehavior());
        endpoint.Behaviors.Add(new ValidateSharedKeyInspector());
        host.Open();
        Console.WriteLine("Host opened");

        SendRequest(baseAddress + "/Echo?text=Hello+world", false);
        SendRequest(baseAddress + "/Echo?text=Hello+world", true);
        SendRequest(baseAddress + "/Add?x=6&y=8", false);
        SendRequest(baseAddress + "/Add?x=6&y=8", true);

        Console.Write("Press ENTER to close the host");
        Console.ReadLine();
        host.Close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Since I am already using a HttpModule to authenticate the user, would it be better to check for the custom header and validate the key value there (after SSL check and before auth challenge)? I have edited my question to include HttpModule code for user authentication. –  kyletme Nov 19 '12 at 22:51
    
Sure, that would work as well. –  carlosfigueira Nov 19 '12 at 22:53
    
Thanks Carlos. Do you think the API key required in the custom header is necessary? I am following a vendor's specs in implementing this requirement. If basic authorization is used over SSL, what am I gaining with the custom header? –  kyletme Nov 19 '12 at 23:43
    
An API key is not a very "secure" mechanism - it mostly makes it dificult for hackers to access it, but not impossible (anyone with a decent network sniffer / fake proxy can monitor the traffic and figure out the key). But many services use that, since it's quite easy to implement and cheap to spot some bad requests which don't come from the "valid" clients. Just be aware that it's not 100% secure. –  carlosfigueira Nov 19 '12 at 23:48
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