Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the package scipy there is the function to define a binary structure (such as a taxicab (2,1) or a chessboard (2,2)).

import numpy
from scipy import ndimage
a = numpy.zeros((6,6), dtype=numpy.int) 
a[1:5, 1:5] = 1;a[3,3] = 0 ; a[2,2] = 2
s = ndimage.generate_binary_structure(2,2) # Binary structure
#.... Calculate Sum of 
result_array = numpy.zeros_like(a)

What i want is to iterate over all cells of this array with the given structure s. Then i want to append a function to the current cell value indexed in a empty array (example function sum), which uses the values of all cells in the binary structure.

For example:

array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0],
    [0, 1, 2, 1, 1, 0],
    [0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0],
    [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])

# The array a. The value in cell 1,2 is currently one. Given the structure s and an example function such as sum the value in the resulting array (result_array) becomes 7 (or 6 if the current cell value is excluded).

Someone got an idea?

share|improve this question
    
where did you get ndimage from? –  Max Li Nov 19 '12 at 22:33
    
ohh, sorry. You have to import it from scipy. Edited the post –  Curlew Nov 19 '12 at 22:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

For the particular case of sums, you could use ndimage.convolve:

In [42]: import numpy as np

In [43]: a = np.zeros((6,6), dtype=np.int) 
a[1:5, 1:5] = 1;
a[3,3] = 0;
a[2,2] = 2

In [48]: s = ndimage.generate_binary_structure(2,2) # Binary structure

In [49]: ndimage.convolve(a,s)
Out[49]: 
array([[1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1],
       [2, 5, 7, 7, 4, 2],
       [3, 7, 9, 9, 5, 3],
       [3, 7, 9, 9, 5, 3],
       [2, 4, 5, 5, 3, 2],
       [1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1]])

For the particular case of products, you could use the fact that log(a*b) = log(a)+log(b) to convert the problem back to one involving sums. For example, if we wanted to "product-convolve" b:

b = a[1:-1, 1:-1]
print(b)
# [[1 1 1 1]
#  [1 2 1 1]
#  [1 1 0 1]
#  [1 1 1 1]]

we could compute:

print(np.exp(ndimage.convolve(np.log(b), s, mode = 'constant')))
# [[ 2.  2.  2.  1.]
#  [ 2.  0.  0.  0.]
#  [ 2.  0.  0.  0.]
#  [ 1.  0.  0.  0.]]

The situation becomes more complicated if b includes negative values:

b[0,1] = -1
print(b)
# [[ 1 -1  1  1]
#  [ 1  2  1  1]
#  [ 1  1  0  1]
#  [ 1  1  1  1]]

but not impossible:

logb = np.log(b.astype('complex'))
real, imag = logb.real, logb.imag
print(np.real_if_close(
    np.exp(
        sum(j * ndimage.convolve(x, s, mode = 'constant')
            for x,j in zip((real, imag),(1,1j))))))
# [[-2. -2. -2.  1.]
#  [-2. -0. -0.  0.]
#  [ 2.  0.  0.  0.]
#  [ 1.  0.  0.  0.]]
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice lateral thinking using a logarithm. –  eryksun Nov 20 '12 at 13:53
    
thanks for providing some examples. However the function sum is just an example. I want to apply various functions to the cell vicinity values (even custom made ones). How does convolve work? Does it apply the function x to each cell value? I need something which returns all values for the cells vicinity to work on (so for cell 1,2 it should work on [0,1,1,2,1,1,0,0,1] –  Curlew Nov 20 '12 at 20:04
1  
Think of s as defining a patch or a mask indicating which cells to add together. So for each cell in a, the patch is placed over that cell, the neighboring cells are selected, and summed. convolve returns an array composed of those summed values. You can also apply different weights to the cells using the weight parameter. But convolve is always going to perform a sum. I do not know of any scipy function which allows you to perform a calculation like convolve except with an arbitrary function. –  unutbu Nov 20 '12 at 20:17
    
However, the example above tries to show how you might extend the possibilities by applying ufuncs before or after convolve. –  unutbu Nov 20 '12 at 20:18
    
mhh, okay. I will work with that and report back in case i've found no solution. Thanks! –  Curlew Nov 20 '12 at 20:27

It's easier if you use a 2-deep wall of zeroes:

In [11]: a0
Out[11]: 
array([[ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.,  2.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  1.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]])

In [12]: b0 = zeros_like(a0)

In [13]: for i in range(1,len(a0)-1):
   ....:     for j in range(1,len(a0)-1):
   ....:         b0[i,j] = sum(a0[i-1:i+2, j-1:j+2] * s)

This enables you to multiply the two sub-matrices together and sum, as desired. (You could also do something more elaborate here...)

In [14]: b0
Out[14]: 
array([[ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  3.,  2.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  2.,  5.,  7.,  7.,  4.,  2.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  3.,  7.,  9.,  9.,  5.,  3.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  3.,  7.,  9.,  9.,  5.,  3.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  2.,  4.,  5.,  5.,  3.,  2.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  3.,  2.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]])

In [15]: b0[1:len(b0)-1, 1:len(b0)-1]
Out[15]: 
array([[ 1.,  2.,  3.,  3.,  2.,  1.],
       [ 2.,  5.,  7.,  7.,  4.,  2.],
       [ 3.,  7.,  9.,  9.,  5.,  3.],
       [ 3.,  7.,  9.,  9.,  5.,  3.],
       [ 2.,  4.,  5.,  5.,  3.,  2.],
       [ 1.,  2.,  3.,  3.,  2.,  1.]])
share|improve this answer
    
The function sum is just an example. I want to apply various functions to the cells vicinity values (even custom made ones). Additionally your script could be a little bit slow (two loops) when confronted with large arrays. Nevertheless +1 –  Curlew Nov 20 '12 at 20:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.