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Very simple question - how can I access data for a struct that lives inside the heap?

Additional information:: I have a class called "A" and a struct within this class called "B". Every "B" that is created will live on the heap. Class "A" is intended to have a vector of "B"'s as a private data member (ie. the class "A" can hold many "B"'s). I have a method in class "A" that will add another new instance of "B" in the vector that "A" has. I also have another method in class "A" that will update every single element that is in the vector of "B" instances. My questions are:

How do I use the getters and setters within my struct?

Here is some code that might help (note: grafix.h is a graphical library)

//.h file
#pragma once
#include <vector>
#include "grafix.h"

class A
{
    public:
        ~A();
        A();

        void addB();
        void updateB();

    private:

        struct B
        {
                 public:
                     ~B()
                     {
                           delete p_b;
                     p_b = 0;
                     }

                     B()
                     {
                     p_b = new B; //I need this here

                     p_ball->x = 0;
                     p_ball->y = 0;
                     p_ball->r = 15;

                      }
                      void setxy(int X, int Y) 
                      {
                     //What does this look like?
                                       //This?
                                       x = X; //?
                                       y = Y;
                      }

                      int retx()
                      {
                                        //Likewise.... ?
                      return x; //?
                      }


                      int rety()
                                  {
                                         return y;
                                  }

                       void update()
                       {
                          draw();

                                           //Movement code taken out for time being
                       }

                  private:
                       int x,y; //xy
                       int r; //radius


                       B* p_b; //pointer to object, do I need this?

                       void draw()
                       {
                         draw_circle_filled(x,y,r); 
                                          //how can I access the data within the struct B here?
                                          //do I use the getters/setters? dereference??
                       }

          };

vector <Ball*> bs; //Holds all of the B's that have been created

};

And then the .cpp file that has the methods. This is where I have my question, am I typing in the right syntax??

#include "A.h"

A::A()
{
        addB();
}

void A::addB()
{
      B* b;

      bs.push_back(b);
}

void A::updateB()
{
       for(int i = 0; i < bs.size(); i++)
       {
            bs[i]->update();
       }
}
share|improve this question
1  
What's the problem you're getting? Your code looks fine. –  Approaching Darkness Fish Nov 19 '12 at 23:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

this is criminal :

void A::addB()
{
      B* b;

      bs.push_back(b);
}

B* b is NOT initialized. Having a reference on it in you container is criminal: dereferencing this address doesnt make sense and is undefined behaviour / crash.

you should assign this way:

{
      B* b = new B;

      bs.push_back(b);
}

Edit: as Kevin commented below as is there is still a memory leak. You'd rather use a container of std::shared_ptr<B>. This way the B oject will be deleted when nobody keeps a shared_ptr pointing to it.

share|improve this answer
1  
I agree it's criminal, however the leaks are also pretty criminal in that you need to manually delete all the elements of the vector too. If it goes out of scope, you've got a huge leak. –  Kevin Anderson Nov 19 '12 at 23:05
    
right ! bs should be a container of std::shared_ptr instead. –  Stephane Rolland Nov 19 '12 at 23:06

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