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I've been banging my head against this one for two days now and finally asking for help.

I created two test tables with minimal data to keep things simple, so at least I have something to work up from, and want to create a third table that I can use to pull data down into my website (I'm hoping to create queries that can pull the data from different tables later, but for now this will have to do).

Here's the info I exported for first TABLE:

CREATE TABLE `about` (
`about_id` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`about_title` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
`about_description` text NOT NULL,
`creator_id` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL,
`about_image` varchar(150) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`about_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=3 ;

INSERT INTO `about` (`about_id`, `about_title`, `about_description`, `creator_id`, `about_image`) VALUES
(1, 'Exciter', 'This is an awesome album', 1, 'images/depeche_mode_exciter.jpg'),
(2, 'Autobahn', 'This is a great album', 2, 'images/kraftwerk_autobahn.jpg');

Here's the info I exported for second TABLE:

CREATE TABLE `creator` (
`creator_id` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`creator_name` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`creator_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=3 ;

INSERT INTO `creator` (`creator_id`, `creator_name`) VALUES
(1, 'Depeche Mode'),
(2, 'Kraftwerk');

And here's the most recent version of what I tried using to create a new TABLE that turns the creator_id into Depeche Mode or whatever the artists is on whatever creator_id row:

CREATE TABLE `about_creator` (
`about_id` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`about_title` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
`about_description` text NOT NULL,
`about_image` varchar(150) NOT NULL,
`creator_id` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`about_id`)
FOREIGN KEY (`creator_id`) REFERENCES `creator` (`creator_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=1 ;

Now seriously, it doesn't get any easier that that surely, but every time I try it I'm getting the following error(s):

#1064 - You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'FOREIGN KEY (`creator_id`) REFERENCES `creator` (`creator_id`) ) ENGINE=InnoDB ' at line 8

I'm accessing PHP Version 5.4.4 from phpMyAdmin 3.5.4 running in MAMP version 2.0

Any help most appreciated.

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1  
That's a syntax error not a foreign key error –  Esailija Nov 19 '12 at 23:11
    
BTW even when I remove part of, or all of ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=3 I still get the errors. –  Paul Seattle Nov 19 '12 at 23:12
    
Yes, that was one of the versions I tried to see if was that particular comma, still having the errors are even if I create anew table it doesn't have any data in it. –  Paul Seattle Nov 19 '12 at 23:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're missing a comma after the definition of your PRIMARY KEY:

CREATE TABLE `about_creator` (
`about_id` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`about_title` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
`about_description` text NOT NULL,
`about_image` varchar(150) NOT NULL,
`creator_id` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`about_id`),
FOREIGN KEY (`creator_id`) REFERENCES `creator` (`creator_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=1 ;

See it on sqlfiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
Although it does create a new table, it isn't pulling anything from the two parents. BTW the version I posted with the missing comma was just one of the most recent ones I was trying, I thought it was at least one of the syntax free versions, sorry about that. –  Paul Seattle Nov 19 '12 at 23:24
    
What do you mean "it isn't pulling anything from the two parents"? What did you expect? Perhaps you misunderstand what foreign key constraints do (as the name suggests, they merely constrain what values are valid). –  eggyal Nov 19 '12 at 23:25
    
I thought foreign keys turned an ID from another table into whatever is on that particular row, so and ID of 5 would be Bjork or whatever. –  Paul Seattle Nov 19 '12 at 23:27
    
I created a table last week that does this and thought it used a foreign key - but now I can't remember how to make another one. –  Paul Seattle Nov 19 '12 at 23:28
    
@PaulSeattle: A table that contains a foreign key merely holds a "pointer" to a record in another table; defining a foreign key constraint merely restricts that referencing column from holding a value that doesn't reference a valid record. If you need to retrieve the foreign data, you should join the tables in your SELECT query. –  eggyal Nov 19 '12 at 23:30

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