Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to measure the time it takes to send x amount of pkts with n amount of bytes through a tcp connection. The only problem is that my packets are getting merged. I know TCP does this by default but how do I get it to send them right away with even merging packets.

Client:

var net = require('net');

var HOST = '127.0.0.1';
var PORT = 6969;
var number_packets = 2500;
var packet_size = 200;
var client = new net.Socket();

client.connect(PORT, HOST, function() {
    client.setNoDelay(true);
    for (var i = 0; i <= 100; i++) {
        var message = new Buffer(packet_size);
        console.log('Sending message #: '+i);
        client.write(message);
    }
});

client.on('data', function(data) {    
    console.log('DATA: ' + data);
    // Close the client socket completely
    client.destroy();
});

client.on('close', function() {
    console.log('Connection closed');
});

Server:

var net = require('net');

var HOST = '127.0.0.1';
var PORT = 6969;
var count = 1;

net.createServer(function(sock) {
    sock.on('data', function(data) {
        var size = data.length;
        console.log('pkt: '+count+' size: '+size);
        //sock.write(data+'-');
        count++;
    });

    sock.on('close', function(data) {
        console.log('CLOSED: ' + sock.remoteAddress +' '+ sock.remotePort);
    });
}).listen(PORT, HOST);

//console.log('Server listening on ' + HOST +':'+ PORT);
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

You've already disabled the Nagle algorithm in your code by setting setNoDelay to true. The problem you are facing is different. The problem you are facing is that the TCP protocol has no concept of packets.

The underlying protocol, IP, handles packets. TCP is a higher level stream based protocol implemented on top of IP that allows software to pretend that it is reading and writing to a file-descriptor. As such, implicit in the intent of the design of the TCP protocol it ignores packet boundaries and merges all messages into a single stream.

Note that your problem is not only with merging of small messages but also the splitting of large messages. It may happen on transmit, it may happen on the receiving end, it may even happen in routers and proxies. You don't really have control where TCP messages are split and merged.

If you want to know exactly where your message ends, you need to use another protocol on top of TCP. One simple example is HTTP:

HTTP 1.0 and earlier implements a very simple condition to signal the end of a packet: simply close the connection. A HTTP 1.0 packet has the following structure:

HTTP/version status (200 for OK) comment (human readable meaning of status code)
headers (note, commands and headers are separated by newlines (\n)) 
headers
headers
two newlines (\n) indicates end of headers:

data
data
data
connection closed indicating end of data

HTTP 1.1 improved this by adding the Content-Length header. This allows HTTP 1.1 to send more than a single "packet" (html file, gif images etc.) per connection. So HTTP 1.1 looks something like this:

HTTP/version status comment
headers
Content-length: number of bytes in the data section
headers

data
data
end of data
HTTP/version status comment (beginning of second packet)
headers
Content-length: number of bytes in the data section
headers

data
data
end of data

Now that's one of the simplest protocols running on top of TCP. But the content-length concept comes from much older protocols. IP itself has a length field. So does Ethernet frames. You can implement a simple protocol for your task using the same idea:

[  len   ][  len   ][  data  ][  data  ][  data  ] ...
     \________/         \____________________/
         |                        |
         |                        |
         |                "length" bytes of data
         |
   two bytes indicating length of packet

Or you can also borrow the idea of using newlines as delimiters as HTTP does. This has the advantage that the protocol is easier to deal with in javascript since it's mostly text based:

data data data data data data\n
   \___________________/      |
             |                |
             |           end of packet
             |
  data section (must not contain newlines)

If the data must contain newlines then you can handle it the way it's handled in JSON: send "\" followed by "n" (ie. implement the "\n" escape sequence). Note that you can chose anything as a delimiter, it doesn't have to be newlines.

You can even mix concepts. Here's a protocol I developed several years ago which is text based but uses the length prefix idea from binary protocols:

12345;data data data data ...
  |  |
  |  |____ semicolon indicates start of data section
  |
  |
 length of data section sent as an ASCII string

The best way, of course, is to use a protocol that others have already invented and implemented in node.js. That saves you from reinventing the wheel. Node even has HTTP built in. Though I understand that for your purpose HTTP adds several hundred bytes of overhead in the headers that is difficult to account for. If you want a low overhead protocol there's always FTP. And there are several implementations on npm.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Once you've made your first client.write call, let the socket's 'drain' events drive your subsequent client.write calls to ensure the previous packet is sent before you try and send another.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.