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Given the following C++11 code

enum class Foods {
  Apple,
  Pear,
  Banana
};

will

std::cout << (unsigned int)Foods::Apple << std::endl;

output 0?

This is true for MSVC 2012 and gcc 4.7.0 however I'm more interested in what the C++11 standard specifies we may rely on. That is, can portable code depend on enumerations defaulting to 0 for the value of the first item?

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If you care about their integer representation then why are you using typesafe enums? –  Pubby Nov 19 '12 at 23:41
    
@Pubby, as to not pollute the namespace unnecessarily. Typesafe enums are also properly scoped. Aside from that, I'm more curious than anything else. –  nixeagle Nov 19 '12 at 23:43
    
Ok, three good answers all saying the same thing. I upvoted all of them, now which do I accept! I guess I'll accept whichever is most fleshed out by tomorrow. :) –  nixeagle Nov 19 '12 at 23:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, they are. It's in §7.2/2:

[...] If the first enumerator has no initializer, the value of the corresponding constant is zero. An enumerator-definition without an initializer gives the enumerator the value obtained by increasing the value of the previous enumerator by one.

This section covers both enum class declarations and regular enum declarations

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The standard doesn't make a distinction between scoped and unscoped enumerations when it comes to the value of the first enumerator that doesn't specify an initializer.

From §7.2/2 [dcl.enum]

The enumeration type declared with an enum-key of only enum is an unscoped enumeration, and its enumerators are unscoped enumerators. The enum-keys enum class and enum struct are semantically equivalent; an enumeration type declared with one of these is a scoped enumeration, and its enumerators are scoped enumerators. [...] If the first enumerator has no initializer, the value of the corresponding constant is zero. [...]

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The initialization for the enum values didn't change: Unless you give a different initial value, they will start with zero and count up from the previous value. The relevant section is in 7.2 [dcl.enum] paragraph 2:

If the first enumerator has no initializer, the value of the corresponding constant is zero. An enumerator-definition without an initializer gives the enumerator the value obtained by increasing the value of the previous enumerator by one.

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