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I have some n number of files in a directory on my unix system. Is there a way to write a shellscript that will transfer all those files via scp to a specified remote system. I'll specify the password within the script, so that I don't have to enter it for each file.

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2  
Can you please tell me if using a password in shell script with rsync worked or if you tried that? thanks. – user201788 Aug 7 '10 at 21:22

12 Answers 12

Instead of hardcoding password in a shell script, use SSH keys, its easier and secure.

$ scp -i ~/.ssh/id_rsa devops@myserver.org:/path/to/bin/*.derp .

assuming your private key is at ~/.ssh/id_rsa

To generate a public / private key pair :

$ ssh-keygen -t rsa

The above will generate 2 files, ~/.ssh/id_rsa (private key) and ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub (public key)

To setup the SSH keys for usage (one time task) : Copy the contents of ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub and paste in a new line of ~devops/.ssh/authorized_keys in myserver.org server. If ~devops/.ssh/authorized_keys doesn't exist, feel free to create it.

A lucid how-to guide is available here.

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The smartest answer IMO. Thanks. – nyxz Mar 23 '15 at 13:06
    
@nyxz thank you! – Pradeep Pati Mar 24 '15 at 13:13
1  
Even after following these instructions, I am still prompted for a password...are there other criterion that I am missing? – Scott Scooter Weidenkopf Jul 7 '15 at 19:09
    
@ScottScooterWeidenkopf there could be a few things that could be wrong, like the .ssh dir or the authorized_keys files may not have right permissions (700). – Pradeep Pati Jul 8 '15 at 12:21
    
@PradeepPati I figured out my problem. You're right, the problem was the permissions. In the link you provided, the author mentioned some permission changes. I made those changes, and now everything works. – Scott Scooter Weidenkopf Jul 8 '15 at 13:07
#!/usr/bin/expect -f

# connect via scp
spawn scp "user@example.com:/home/santhosh/file.dmp" /u01/dumps/file.dmp
#######################
expect {
  -re ".*es.*o.*" {
    exp_send "yes\r"
    exp_continue
  }
  -re ".*sword.*" {
    exp_send "PASSWORD\r"
  }
}
interact

http://blogs.oracle.com/SanthoshK/entry/automate_linux_scp_command

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Perfect answer @JohnA – siddhusingh Jun 26 '12 at 12:00
    
Very Very Tank U ;) – Ali Mohammadi Jun 9 '13 at 7:13
3  
Best use sign certificate to get rid of password requirements. bootlog.org/blog/linux/tip-ssh-scp-y-un-as-bajo-la-manga – Cedric Simon Jul 15 '14 at 4:49

you could also use rsync. It seems to work better for multiple files than scp IMHO.

rsync -avzh /path/to/dir/ user@remote:/path/to/remote/dir/

Update

You can use rsync via ssh by adding the '-e' switch:

rsync -avzh -e ssh /path/do/dir/ user@remote:/path/to/remote/dir/
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3  
The nice thing about scp ist that it uses a secure channel. rsync does not. – lutz Aug 28 '09 at 11:52
2  
You can force rsync to use ssh: 'rsync -avz -e ssh remoteuser@remotehost:/remote/dir /this/dir/' – flokra Aug 28 '09 at 11:57
    
@flokra. Thanks, I was right in the middle of adding that update and got distracted. – bsisco Aug 28 '09 at 12:03
4  
This will still invoke an interactive password prompt. I believe the OP wanted a fully automated solution – Tom Auger Jul 14 '11 at 22:19
    
@Tom scp -r will work perfectly – Dimitri Aug 17 '11 at 13:22
#!/usr/bin/expect -f
spawn scp -r BASE.zip abhishek@192.168.1.115:/tmp
expect "password:"
send "wifinetworks\r"
expect "*\r"
expect "\r"
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Can expect be used for rsync? I am trying to do something and my RSA key method is not working. It keeps asking me the password for the remote machine. – user201788 Aug 7 '10 at 21:22

rsync is a program that behaves in much the same way that rcp does, but has many more options and uses the rsync remote-update protocol to greatly speed up file transfers when the destination file is being updated.

The rsync remote-update protocol allows rsync to transfer just the differences between two sets of files across the network connection, using an efficient checksum-search algorithm described in the technical report that accompanies this package.


Copying folder from one location to another

   #!/usr/bin/expect -f   
   spawn rsync -a -e ssh username@192.168.1.123:/cool/cool1/* /tmp/cool/   
   expect "password:"   
   send "cool\r"   
   expect "*\r"   
   expect "\r"  
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What about wildcards or multiple files?

scp file1 file2 more-files* user@remote:/some/dir/
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If you are ok with entering your password once for every run of the script, you can do so easily using an SSH master connection.

#!/usr/bin/env bash

USER_AT_HOST="user@host"  # use "$1@$2" here if you like
SSHSOCKET=~/".ssh/$USER_AT_HOST"

# This is the only time you have to enter the password:
# Open master connection:
ssh -M -f -N -o ControlPath="$SSHSOCKET" "$USER_AT_HOST"

# These do not prompt for your password:
scp -o ControlPath="$SSHSOCKET" file1.xy "$USER_AT_HOST":remotefile1.xy
scp -o ControlPath="$SSHSOCKET" file2.xy "$USER_AT_HOST":remotefile2.xy

# You can also use the flag for normal ssh:
ssh -o ControlPath="$SSHSOCKET" "$USER_AT_HOST" "echo hello"
ssh -o ControlPath="$SSHSOCKET" "$USER_AT_HOST" "echo world"

# Close master connection:
ssh -S "$SSHSOCKET" -O exit "$USER_AT_HOST"
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why don't you try this?

password="your password"
username="username"
Ip="<IP>"
sshpass -p "$password" scp /<PATH>/final.txt $username@$Ip:/root/<PATH>
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You can do it with ssh public/private keys only. Or use putty in which you can set the password. scp doesn't support giving password in command line.

You can find the instructions for public/private keys here: http://www.softpanorama.org/Net/Application_layer/SSH/scp.shtml

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I have some n number of files in a directory on my unix system. Is there a way to write a shellscript that will transfer all those files via scp to a specified remote system. I'll specify the password within the script, so that I don't have to enter it for each file.

share|improve this answer

This will work:

#!/usr/bin/expect -f

spawn scp -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no file1 file2 file3 user@host:/path/
expect "password:"
send "xyz123\r"
expect "*\r"
expect "\r"
interact
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The command scp can be used like a traditional UNIX cp. SO if you do :

scp -r myDirectory/ mylogin@host:TargetDirectory

will work

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This does not appear to address the Password. – Delicia Brummitt Jun 28 '13 at 18:37

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