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So, my problem is simple, I whant to create a function to separate the words in the file and parse those words and create an special think for those words, but, I have an error in strcat, when I try to separate the tokens:

look the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string>
#include <Windows.h>

using namespace std;

bool compile(FILE *fp)
{
    char c;
    char token[256];
    bool _return = false;

    while ((c = getc(fp)) != EOF)
    {
        if(isalpha(c))
        {
                    // The error is here
            strcat(token, (char*)c);
            printf("%c\n", c);
        }
        else
        {
            printf("----> %c\n", c);
        }
    }

    printf("%s\n", token);

    return _return;
}

int main()
{
    char *filename = "test.in";

    FILE *fp = fopen(filename, "rb");
    if(!fp)
    {
        return 1;
    }

    if(!compile(fp))
    {
        printf("ERROR...\n");
    }
    fclose(fp);
}

THe code builds normally, but, when I debug, the debugger goes to strcat.asm file :( So, where is my error, thanks for the help. (:

-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-> edit And, when I change the strcat to:

strcat(token, &c)

I receive this error from the debugger:

Unhandled exception at 0x20E801F2 in APP.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation (parameters: 0x00000008).

share|improve this question
    
token is uninitialized. Try token[0] = 0; before entering the loop. –  Hot Licks Nov 20 '12 at 1:44
    
But casting a char to char* is meaningless, so you're still broken. –  Hot Licks Nov 20 '12 at 1:45
    
and you can't strcat a character. so either do token[1] = 0; before the strcat. Or replace the strcat with token[token_len++] = c; token[token_len] = 0; But check you don't exceed token's buffer size. –  peterept Nov 20 '12 at 1:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

strcat expects a null-terminated string; you cannot pass a pointer to an individual character and expect it to work correctly.

Replace

strcat(token, (char*)c);

with

char tmp[2];
tmp[0] = c;
tmp[1] = '\0';
strcat(token, tmp);

to make it work.

You also need to set token[0] to zero to avoid undefined behavior due to it not being initialized.

share|improve this answer
    
token will still be uninitialized... –  Dietrich Epp Nov 20 '12 at 4:55
    
@DietrichEpp You are right, the latest C++ standard has changed that (PODs used to be zero-initialized per the old standard). Thanks! –  dasblinkenlight Nov 20 '12 at 13:36

This is wrong:

strcat(token, (char *) c);

The variable c isn't a string, it's only a single character. The cast to (char *) is just masking a compiler error.

If you want to add characters to a string one at a time,

std::size_t pos = 0;
char buf[256];

// ...

if (isalpha(c)) {
    assert(pos < sizeof(buf));
    buf[pos++] = c;
}

// ...

assert(pos < sizeof(buf));
buf[pos] = '\0';
printf("buf = %s\n", buf);

Or, you know, do it the easy way:

#include <string>

std::string s;

// ...

if (isalpha(c)) {
    s += c;
}

// ...

printf("buf = %s\n", s.c_str());

Don't bother to debug the insides of strcat(). If your program crashes inside strcat(), it is an error in the calling function. (It's usually an error to even call strcat() at all.)

share|improve this answer

When you cast c to char *, you're turning whatever value was in the character (say 100 in hexadecimal) into a memory address (0x100) and then looking for a string at that memory address. No wonder it doesn't work! You'll want to turn the character into a string before popping it into strcat.

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Three things:

  • You don't check if you overflow the 256 characters in your buffer
  • When you convert char c to (char *) c you are saying that c is a memory address. In actuality, it is a value. What you probably want is a reference to the character, &c
  • You need to add a null terminator to the end of what you are concatenating.
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