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java: is using a final static int = 1 better than just a normal 1?

Well I'd like to know what difference between: final int a=10; and final static int a=10; when they're the member variables of a class, they both hold the same value and cannot be changed anytime during the execution. Is there any other difference than that the static variable is shared by all the objects and a copy is created in case of non-static variable?

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marked as duplicate by Luiggi Mendoza, krock, Lex, Linus Kleen, stealthyninja Nov 20 '12 at 9:31

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Your example doesn't demonstrate the difference between static and non-static variables, because you set the value of your variable as soon as you declare it. See my answer for an explanation of when there IS a difference. –  jahroy Nov 20 '12 at 2:25

5 Answers 5

There is no practical difference if you initialize the variable when you declare it.

If the variable is initialized in a constructor, it makes a big difference.

See the example below:

/** 
 *  If you do this, it will make almost no 
 *  difference whether someInt is static or 
 *  not.
 *
 *  This is because the value of someInt is
 *  set immediately (not in a constructor).
 */

class Foo {
    private final int someInt = 4;
}


/**
 *  If you initialize someInt in a constructor,
 *  it makes a big difference.  
 *
 *  Every instance of Foo can now have its own 
 *  value for someInt. This value can only be
 *  set from a constructor.  This would not be 
 *  possible if someInt is static.
 */

class Foo {
    private final int someInt;

    public Foo() {
        someInt = 0;
    }

    public Foo(int n) {
        someInt = n;
    }

}
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1  
Great answer showing the key (often overlooked) difference. +1 –  asteri Nov 20 '12 at 2:27
    
+1 If you have a field which never changes like this the JVM can optimise it to make it static so you don't even waste memory in each object. IMHO static is clearer that this is not a mistake. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 20 '12 at 9:30

A static variable is accessible via the dot separator outside of it's class definition. So if you have a class called myClass and inside it you have static int x = 5; then you can refer to it with myClass.x;

The final keyword means you are not allowed to change the value of x after it has been defined. The compiler will stop with an error if you attempt to do so.

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Actually, the compiler will complain if you try to assign to a final variable. It won't get as far as throwing an error (which is a run-time event). –  Ted Hopp Nov 20 '12 at 2:38
    
Java will not "warn" you either. The compiler will stop with an error. –  Cyrille Ka Nov 20 '12 at 5:58

As a static variable, you don't need an instance of the class to access the value. The only other difference is that the static field is not serialized (if the class is serializable). It's also possible that all references to it in compiled code are optimized away.

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The difference doesn't show up if you're only using ints. However, as an example of how it's different:

class PrintsSomething {
   PrintsSomething(String msg) {
       System.out.println(msg);
   }
}

class Foo {
    public static final PrintsSomething myStaticObject = new PrintsSomething("this is static");
    public final PrintsSomething myLocalObject = new PrintsSomething("this is not");
}

When we run this:

new Foo();
new Foo();

...the output is this:

this is static
this is not
this is not
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I would point out, that the static modifier should only be used with explicit needs, and the final only for constants.

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