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This HTML source code:

<td class="result">'DIVIS&Atilde;O DE EDUCA&Ccedil;&Atilde;O
PR?ESCOLAR E ENSINO PRIM&Aacute;RIOO'</td>

displays as: 'DIVISÃO DE EDUCAÇÃO PR?ESCOLAR E ENSINO PRIMÁRIOO'

Yeah, these are some Portuguese characters. Why does &Atilde; stand for Ã?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
&Atilde; is an entity much like &nbsp ;

It stands for a unicode point which defines the character A with a tilde on top.

This effect is not due to any special character encoding. The entity is defined in all common encodings. Have a look at ISO-8859-1:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO/IEC%5F8859-1

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-1 for reformatting using code, and bringing in the whole topic of encodings -- encoding doesn't matter here, and the OP didn't mention it, so stick to entities –  kdgregory Aug 28 '09 at 12:12

That's just HTML character entities. Here's a whole list. &Atilde; stands for the à character because it's a reasonable name for an A with a ~ over it ;-)

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+1 for adding the reference ... and not posting your answer in code –  kdgregory Aug 28 '09 at 12:11
    
"character entity", not "character encoding". –  T.J. Crowder Aug 28 '09 at 12:16
    
@T.J. Crowder: Thanks, updated my typo. –  Vinay Sajip Aug 28 '09 at 12:19

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