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So the situation is something like this:

private void myMethod()
{
    System.out.println("Hello World"); //some code

    System.out.println("Some Other Stuff"); 

    System.out.println("Hello World"); //the same code. 

}

We don't want to be repeating our code.

The technique described here works pretty well:

private void myMethod()
{
    final Runnable innerMethod = new Runnable()
    {
        public void run()
        {
            System.out.println("Hello World"); 
        }
    };

    innerMethod.run();
    System.out.println("Some other stuff"); 
    innerMethod.run(); 
}

But what if I want to pass in a parameter to that inner method?

eg.

private void myMethod()
{
    final Runnable innerMethod = new Runnable()
    {

        public void run(int value)
        {
            System.out.println("Hello World" + Integer.toString(value)); 
        }
    };

    innerMethod.run(1);
    System.out.println("Some other stuff"); 
    innerMethod.run(2); 
}

gives me: The type new Runnable(){} must implement the inherited abstract method Runnable.run()

While

private void myMethod()
{
    final Runnable innerMethod = new Runnable()
    {
        public void run()
        {
            //do nothing
        }

        public void run(int value)
        {
            System.out.println("Hello World" + Integer.toString(value)); 
        }
    };

    innerMethod.run(1);
    System.out.println("Some other stuff"); 
    innerMethod.run(2); 
}

gives me The method run() in the type Runnable is not applicable for the arguments (int).

share|improve this question
    
Okay, it's not at all clear to me why this involves runnables and presumably multithreading - can you clarify that? – djechlin Nov 20 '12 at 3:57
    
Are you aware that Runnable is a pre-defined interface used for multithreading? Why don't you create your own interface? – Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 3:58
    
It's the only solution I've found to do a method in method in Java. – dwjohnston Nov 20 '12 at 3:58
    
But why you want a method in method? – Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 3:59
    
Runnable wasn't designed for this purpose (docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/Runnable.html). Did you try defining your own interface instead of using Runnable ? This way you'll have all the latitude you need. – Jerome Nov 20 '12 at 4:00
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Looks like you just want inner methods. Java does't let you have them, so the Runnable hack you describe lets you sort-of declare an inner method.

But since you want more control over it, why not define your own:

interface Inner<A, B> {
    public B apply(A a);
}

Then you can say:

private void myMethod(..){ 
    final Inner<Integer, Integer> inner = new Inner<Integer, Integer>() {
        public Integer apply(Integer i) {
            // whatever you want
        }
    };


    // then go:
    inner.apply(1);
    inner.apply(2);

}

Or use some library that provides functor objects. There should be many. Apache Commons has a Functor that you can use.

share|improve this answer
    
public B apply(a A); - is this a typo? you mean public B apply (A a)? Also - I think you are missing something with the implementation - with code as it is gives me The type new InnerMethod(){} must implement the inherited abstract method InnerMethod.apply(Object) – dwjohnston Nov 26 '12 at 0:26
    
Yes sorry about that. I should have marked it as untested code. Fixed now. – Faiz Nov 26 '12 at 0:43
    
Hmm - how I would I write it if I wanted to create a void method? (Or pass in a void parameter?). – dwjohnston Nov 26 '12 at 0:46
    
How about Void? docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/Void.html – Faiz Nov 26 '12 at 0:50
    
Thanks. :) 1234:) – dwjohnston Nov 26 '12 at 0:55

Nope, that isn't a method but an anonymous object. You can create an extra method to use for the object.

 Thread thread = new Thread(  new Runnable()
    {
      int i,j;
      public void init(int i, int j)
      {
        this.i = i;
        this.j=j;
      }
    });
thread.init(2,3);
thread.start();

And wrap runnable in a Thread, and call start! Not run(). Because you can't call the constructor of an anonymous class, as pointed out by @HoverCraft you could extend a named class that implements Runnable.

public class SomeClass implements Runnable
{
   public SomeClass(int i){ }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Or use a non-anonymous class with a constructor that takes the parameter values of interest. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Nov 20 '12 at 4:03
    
Yep, that'd work as well. – Lews Therin Nov 20 '12 at 4:03
    
It works but I'm not sure it helps the OP in the long term. Using Thread / Runnable for this purpose just feels terribly wrong, not to mention the side-effects start() can produce. – Jerome Nov 20 '12 at 4:13
    
@Jerome Unfortunately the OP doesn't explain why he or she wants it that way. – Lews Therin Nov 20 '12 at 4:16

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