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I'm having a problem trying to send strings back and forth between a simple Java socket client and a simple C socket server.

It works as follows:

Java client sends msg to C server

    out.writeBytes(msg);

C server receives the msg and puts info buf

    if ((numbytes = recv(new_fd, buf, MAXDATASIZE-1, 0)) == -1) {
        perror("recv");
        exit(1);
    }

C server sends the msg back to the Java client

    if ((len = send(new_fd, buf, numbytes, 0)) == -1)
        perror("send");

However the Java client cannot receive the msg from the C server, i've tried using DataInputStream, BufferedReader, reading into char[], byte[], converting to string but cannot get the received msg. When trying to read into an array on the client side I sometimes get only the first character which leads me to believe it's a blocking problem?

Any help would be appreciated

Code:

C server main loop

    while(1) {  // main accept() loop
    sin_size = sizeof their_addr;
    new_fd = accept(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&their_addr, &sin_size);
    if (new_fd == -1) {
        perror("accept");
        continue;
    }

    inet_ntop(their_addr.ss_family,
        get_in_addr((struct sockaddr *)&their_addr),
        s, sizeof s);
    printf("server: got connection from %s\n", s);

    if ((numbytes = recv(new_fd, buf, MAXDATASIZE-1, 0)) == -1) {
        perror("recv");
        exit(1);
    }

    buf[numbytes] = '\0';

    printf("msg size: '%d' bytes\n",numbytes);
    printf("received msg: %s\n",buf);
    char* array = (char*)buf;
    printf("as char array: %s\n", array);


    if (!fork()) { // this is the child process
        close(sockfd); // child doesn't need the listener
        int len = 0;
        if ((len = send(new_fd, buf, numbytes, 0)) == -1)
            perror("send");
        printf("sent %d bytes\n", len);
        close(new_fd);
        exit(0);
    }
    close(new_fd);  // parent doesn't need this
}

Java client

    public void send(String text){
    Socket sock = null;
    DataInputStream in = null;
    DataOutputStream out = null;
    BufferedReader inReader = null;

    try {
        sock = new Socket(HOST, PORT);
        System.out.println("Connected");
        in = new DataInputStream(sock.getInputStream());
        out = new DataOutputStream(sock.getOutputStream());

        out.writeBytes(text + "\n");

        String res = "";

        //get msg from c server and store into res

        System.out.println("Response: " + res);
    } catch (UnknownHostException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        try {
            sock.close();
            //in.close();
            out.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why the fork? It would make much more sense if it was done directly after the accept and you were doing lots of reading/writing in a loop. Here you do one receive and one send and then close the connection, no fork needed. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 20 '12 at 6:20
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1 Answer

Try:

out.writeBytes(text + "\n");
out.flush();

DataOutputStream is buffered

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for reply, but now i'm getting SocketException: Connection reset on every call from in, e.g. in.read(), in.readLine() etc –  meanrims Nov 20 '12 at 4:44
    
it might be that the server closes connection when it receives your request –  Evgeniy Dorofeev Nov 20 '12 at 5:03
    
How can i tell? All the calls to close the sockets come after i send the msg back to the client... Cheers –  meanrims Nov 20 '12 at 5:23
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