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I've been trying to solve a programming challenge that involves combinatorics and dynamic programming.

click here to read the problem

Good news is that I already solved it, but for certain inputs the program throws wrong answers.

The program takes two numbers as input. Let w = argv[1], h = argv[2]

I'm gonna write it in pseudo-mathematical way for easier representation

E.g. The following "formula" means that my program accepts two parameters: w and h, and the output is x

T(w,h) = x

I'm going to represent the theoretical results by T(w,h) and my program's results by R(w, h). I'm 100% sure that T(w, h) will always be the right answer.

Let's go:

T(10, 10) = 2 R(10, 10) = 2

T(11, 10) = 2 R(11, 10) = 288 ** RESULTS DIFFER **

T(12, 10) = 4 R(12, 10) = 4

T(13, 10) = 4 R(13, 10) = 4

T(14, 10) = 66 R(14, 10) = 66

T(15, 10) = 290 R(15, 10) = 290

T(20, 10) = 9594 R(20, 10) = 98826 RESULTS DIFFER

T(25, 10) = 419854 R(25, 10) = 419854

T(30, 10) = 94082988 R(30, 10) = 94082988

T(35, 10) = 5578404294 R(35, 10) = 1283436998 FROM THIS POINT ON, RESULTS WILL ALWAYS DIFFER

T(36, 10) = 19730715436 R(36, 10) = 18446744071965430572 DATA TYPE OVERFLOW?

T(37, 10) = 19730715436 R(37, 10) = 18446744071965430572

T(38, 10) = 73368404198 R(38, 10) = 393345822 This result is smaller than the last one, is supposed to be bigger than the last one.

T(39, 10) = 287780277370 R(39, 10) = 17468538

T(40, 10) = 287780277370 R(40, 10) = 17468538

T(41, 10) = 1095232487336 R(41, 10) = 15826856

T(42, 10) = 4013757692218 R(42, 10) = 18446744071672822074 GOES UP AGAIN. TAKES RIDICULOUS AMOUNT OF TIME TO COMPUTE

I guess that's enough for black box testing, now let's take a look at the algorithm and the actual code.

The first parameter is multiplied by 2, divided by 3 and casted to integer.

E.g.

  1. argv1 = 20

  2. 20*2 = 40

  3. 40/3 = 13 Integer division

That value is passed to the function that is giving me problems.

Let iNormalizedWidth be that value.

If iNormalizedWidth is an odd number, the program will give me a wrong answer all the time. Only gives me wrong answers with the following numbers:

11, 20, 25, 29, 35 - 48.

(48 is the maximum value that my program will handle).

This is the function that I wrote :

typedef long long int int64; 
#define BLOCK_A = 2;
#define BLOCK_B = 3;

/* main function, more macros, prototypes of other functions and
   irrelevant information for the scope of my question */


vector< vector<int64> > iTileBricks(int iWidth) {
    int iK, i, j, iMaxIterations, iEvenWidth, iOffset;
    vector<int64> viBrickRange;
    vector< vector<int64> > viBrickWall;    
    vector< vector<int64> > viResult;
    iEvenWidth = iWidth % 2;
    iK = (int)(iWidth/2);                                   // The amount of all possible combinations that follow the pattern nCr(iN-i,2i)
    iMaxIterations = iK/3 + 1;                              // By dividing all the possible combinations by 3, I am finding out how the maximum amount of iterations
    for(i = 0; i < iMaxIterations; i++) {
            iOffset = 2*i + iEvenWidth;    
            vector<bool> vAux(iK-i);                        // Creating a iK - i long vector. Test Case:
                                                            // Let  dOriginalPanelWidth = 48
                                                            //      iPanelWidth = 32
                                                            //      iK = iPanelWidth/2 = 16
                                                            //      iMaxIterations = iK/3  ~= 5
                                                            //      iK - i = 16 - i Where 1 <= i <= 5
                                                            //      For the first iteration of i the value of vAux will be: 
            if(iOffset <= iK-i) { 
                    fill(vAux.begin() + iOffset, vAux.end(), true); //      For the first iteration of i the value of vAux will be: 
            }   
                                                            //      vAux = [0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
            do {                                            // In this block of code I'm generating all the possible layouts of bricks that can build
                    for(j = 0; j < iK-i; j++) {             // a wall of 48" (or any value of width where  3 <= width <= 48 and (width % 1/2) == 0). 
                            if(vAux[j] == false) {
                                    viBrickRange.push_back(j);      // Generating n-tuples with all possible combinations
                            }   
                    }   
                    viBrickWall.push_back(viBrickRange);
                    viBrickRange.clear();
            } while(next_permutation(vAux.begin(), vAux.end()));


            for(unsigned int a=0; a < viBrickWall.size(); a++) {
                    vector<int64> viTmp(iK-i);
                    fill(viTmp.begin(), viTmp.end(), BLOCK_A);
                    for(unsigned int b = 0; b < viBrickWall[a].size(); b++) {
                            viTmp[viBrickWall[a][b]] = BLOCK_B;
                    }   
                    viResult.push_back(viTmp);
                    viTmp.clear();

            }   
            viBrickWall.clear();
            vAux.clear();
    }   
    return viResult;

}

I found a program that works written in python, and the latter function is nothing more than a port from the python function to C++. If it helps, just for reference here it is:

def all_single_rows(width):
    result = []
    n = width / 2 
    width_parity = width % 2 
    for i in range(n/3 + 1): 
            for bits in combinations(range(n-i), 2*i + width_parity):
                    s = [2] * (n-i)
                    for bit in bits:
                            s[bit] = 3 
                    result.append(s)
    return result

It's a rather large function (and question), but I've been trying to debug this all day long, and I haven't been able to come up with a solution.

There are more computations that generate the final value, but this is the function that is causing the other functions to fail.

I'd like to know any theory on why for certain inputs, the answer skyrockets, and then it goes back again.

When I compare my function with the function written in python side-by-side for some inputs, the output is identical, and for some others (shown above) the output is different.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks a lot!

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1  
What is all_single_rows(7)? – Beta Nov 20 '12 at 5:27
    
That's a function written in python that I want to port to C++ – AlanChavez Nov 20 '12 at 5:32
1  
No, not "what is all_single_rows?", I asked "what is all_single_rows(7)"? I don't know python, and I'm asking what value that function returns, if it is invoked with an argument of 7. – Beta Nov 20 '12 at 13:29
    
Oh, My bad! If I invoke all_single_rows(7); it returns a 3 x 3 Matrix: [[3, 2, 2],[2, 3, 2], [2, 2, 3]] – AlanChavez Nov 20 '12 at 16:23
    
if I invoke my function, it return a vector of vector: [[3, 2, 2], [2, 3, 2], [2, 2, 3], [3, 3]] – AlanChavez Nov 20 '12 at 16:26
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I already solved the problem, the answer was pretty easy and it was a subtle modification to the condition.

Basically, I was generating an extra set of possible combinations, in order to get rid of that, I needed to expand my initial condition.

Basically, right after:

vector<bool> vAux(iK-i);

I needed to enclose all the following instructions into the following condition:

if(iOffset <= iK-i)

and that solved my problem.

Thanks you all for looking at my problem!

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