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I have a practice question that I'm stumped on - to get the number of leaf nodes in a binary tree without using recursion. I've had a bit of a look around for ideas, I've seen some such as passing the nodes to a stack, but I don't see how to do it when there's multiple branches. Can anyone provide a pointer?

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1  
Do a non-recursive walk across the tree and count the leaves. You can replace recursion by a stack, by a queue or by defining the order. –  Jan Dvorak Nov 20 '12 at 4:57
    
What do you mean without using recursion? Any recursive function can be done iteratively. The problem is still recursive though... –  tjameson Nov 20 '12 at 4:58
    
I'll have a look at how to do a non-recursive walk. By recursion, I suppose I mean having a method that calls itself. –  andrewb Nov 20 '12 at 5:02
    
I've come up with a bit of a solution based off a simple binary tree walk - should I post it in my question, or just provide it as an answer? Jan what you said is probably enough of an answer.. quite a simple question really. –  andrewb Nov 20 '12 at 5:18
    
See stackoverflow.com/a/547636/346048 –  Reuben Morais Nov 20 '12 at 5:25

1 Answer 1

NumberOfLeafNodes(root);
int NumberOfLeafNodes(NODE *p)
{
    NODE *nodestack[50];
    int top=-1;
    int count=0;
    if(p==NULL)
        return 0;
    nodestack[++top]=p;
    while(top!=-1)
    {
        p=nodestack[top--];
        while(p!=NULL)
        {
            if(p->leftchild==NULL && p->rightchild==NULL)
                count++;
            if(p->rightchild!=NULL)
                nodestack[++top]=p->rightchild;
            p=p->leftchild;      
        }
    }
return count;
}
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Thanks for the response. I don't know this language, I'm guessing Obj-C or C++, can you please explain this code? I can't test it so I can't really mark this as the answer until it at least makes sense to me. –  andrewb Jan 30 '13 at 9:44
    
that is C. It assumes a NODE struct type has been defined via typedef. You can see it as some kind of object with left-child and right-child properties. The rest is pretty self-explanatory if you know any other programming language. –  stanm87 Aug 29 '13 at 14:57

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